Superintendent Race Heats Up: Garcia Accuses Huppenthal of Flip-Flopping on Common Core

arizona-education-building.jpg
Matthew Hendley

The debate over Common Core has been central to the race for State Superintendent of Public Education, and one challenger of incumbent John Huppenthal's claims that his opponent is sending mixed signals on exactly where he stands.

See also:
-John Huppenthal Apologizes for Blog Comments but Won't Resign
-John Huppenthal, Arizona Schools Chief, Shilling for Private Schools

David Garcia, a contender in the August 26 Democratic primary, cites Huppenthal's recent radio interview with John C. Scott, in which Huppenthal said he is opposed to the "new definition" of Common Core and that he would seek a review of the standards to "keep all the good stuff" and to cut what he referred to as the "crap." Huppenthal previously had been a strong proponent of the Common Core guidelines-- called the College and Career Ready Standards here in Arizona -- referring to opponents as "barbarians at the gate."

Huppenthal's office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The August 26 Republican primary will pit Huppenthal against Diane Douglas, whose campaign platform revolves around stopping Common Core in the state. Her website, in answer to the question of why she is running, says, "Quite simply, to stop the Common Core Standards in Arizona."

The Democratic primary pits Garcia, an education professor at ASU, against Sharon Thomas, a teacher. Thomas supports Common Core, claiming on her website to be "the only candidate who has written curriculum aligned to Common Core and taught under the CC standards."

Garcia supports Common Core as part of the school-improvement equation but wants it to be used in the scheme of a larger school accountability structure that looks at more than just test scores. "I am in favor of the Common Core standards, and we need a high quality assessment to gauge those standards," he says. "Where I differ from all of the other candidates in this race is my belief that we need to look beyond standardized tests to measure student academic achievement."

Garcia claims that unlike Huppenthal, his stance on Common Core has remained consistent throughout the campaign.

The general election for State Superintendent of Public Education will be held on November 4.

Got a tip? Send it to: Ashley Cusick.

Follow Valley Fever on Twitter at @ValleyFeverPHX.

Follow Ashley Cusick on Twitter at @AshleyBCusick.


My Voice Nation Help
15 comments
AkaTed
AkaTed

Loving the new Huppenthal Political Ad's in the West Valley with him wrapped up with the kids. Funniest shit I've seen in a long time..After his blogging he has Zero Credibility 

Mark Trollinger
Mark Trollinger

Huppenthal has zero credibility after his blog posting hobby so he shouldn't even comment

Ralph Byrns
Ralph Byrns

We can't afford Common Core? Baloney! We can't NOT to afford Common Core. (With a bow in the direction of the Thistlebottom teachers who abhor "double negatives.")

Ralph Byrns
Ralph Byrns

Math at its best is creative and imaginative. If you truly understand math, mysterious aspects of the world are revealed, and you will be in awe, not merely confused. Unfortunately, traditional math instruction was mechanical in the 1950s when I was a student, and it still is. In graduate school I finally learned to apply formulas "learned" in high school but which I did not truly understand. How many PNT readers remember being bewildered by the quadratic formula? I definitely was, because that mechanical formula appeared to have ZERO practical applications. I'm fairly sure that my ninth grade algebra teacher had no clue about applications for quadratics. The Common Core approach to teaching math requires teachers to understand certain applications and techniques. Some teachers may require continuing education units (CEUs) to "get it." if teachers get geared up so that they understand, American students can catch up to students taught math conceptually, instead of by rote. And they will be able to understand the wondrous workings of many previously inexplicable events, both everyday and universal events. Other areas of study are similarly improved by the Common Core approach. I bet a lot of folks remember being incredibly bored in school. Common Core engages students in far more interesting ways. It's time to discard traditional and inefficient modes of education.

phale68993
phale68993

Opposition to Common Core has two factions. The right wing group that believes CC is an evil plot to take over the minds of children. The other opposition comes from experienced teachers (primarily elementary teachers) who believe some of the standards are  developmentally inappropriate for the cognitive development of small children. This inappropriateness occurred because of the faulty process for creating the standards. Teachers were not included in the standards creation process(no matter what some say), but only in the review process. "The work was confidential throughout the process."


http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/living-in-dialogue/2013/12/the_making_of_common_core_crea.html?cmp=ENL-EU-NEWS3


Teachers are not opposed to teaching to standards. They've been doing it for years. Teachers are opposed however, to having their profession usurped by corporatists who think they understand teaching and learning.



Tom Adikes
Tom Adikes

I think it goes even deeper than that. Right wingers have been trying to gut public education for a long time, in favor of private schools for the well-to-do, sponsored by vouchers from taxpayers. By stigmatizing Common Core, they can deflect the blame for the systematic underfunding of public education, while still criticizing the system they've created.

Nathan Schneider
Nathan Schneider

Arizona has already adopted Common Core and received federal funding to assist with implementation.

Nathan Schneider
Nathan Schneider

Republicans are politicizing this issue. Common Core isn't new. It has been around for a while and many people from all over the country have provided input. Most states have already implemented Common Core or a variation of it. Unfortunately, this is just another issue tea partiers have latched onto in order to show their complete insanity and dislike for anything Democrats or the federal government does.

Andy LaRusch
Andy LaRusch

And there's also the fact that our state superintendent of schools and our governor basically got in a public pissing match over it since Jan Brewer has to flex her biceps at the federal government every time they ask States to do something doesn't help either.

Andy LaRusch
Andy LaRusch

Nope. Common core isn't great. The state has already underfunded it's schools by 1.6 billion over the last three years. Implementing new tests without supporting that with proper funding means bad things for students. Common core was a very media hyped idea, but once the picture became more clear that these significant changes and the need for 'retooling' the education system across the nation wouldn't be accompanied by funding to get it done, many states dropped out fast.

Tom Adikes
Tom Adikes

I don't get it. Are people just afraid their kids are too stupid?

phale68993
phale68993

More:

Common Core should not be accepted carte blanche without revisions. That won't happen though because the standards are copy written and owned by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers. It was funded by the Gates Foundation.

http://www.educationnews.org/ed_reports/156080.html#sthash.dfrBI8WZ.dpuf

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/diane-ravitch/bill-gates-common-core_b_4079447.html


Dr. Garcia should clarify his support for Common Core.

Now Trending

Phoenix Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

Loading...