More Arizonans Living in High-Poverty Neighborhoods

Categories: News
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Census Buraeu


An increasing number of Arizonans are living in high-poverty neighborhoods, according to a new Census Bureau report.

About one-quarter of Americans live in what the Census Bureau calls "poverty areas," and in Arizona, more than one-third of people live in such areas.

A "poverty area" is where 20 percent or more of the population is living in poverty.

When the Census Bureau tracked this information a decade ago, it found that Arizona then had about a quarter of its residents living in such areas, still ahead of the national average, which was then 18 percent.

Even with now up to one-third of Arizonans living in this poverty areas, Arizona still didn't have the largest chunk of its population moving into poverty:

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A more striking look at Arizona is when you take into account the change among the counties. It had been that the more rural counties had the most people living in these areas. Now, living in an impoverished neighborhood is for everyone:

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The concentration of impoverished people living in these areas has also gone up over the last decade, in Arizona, and on the national average.

"Problems associated with living in poverty areas, such as, higher crime rates, poor housing conditions, and fewer job opportunities are exacerbated when poor families live clustered in high-poverty neighborhoods," the Census report says. "In recognition of these burdens, some government programs target resources to these high-poverty neighborhoods."

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Follow Matthew Hendley at @MatthewHendley.


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10 comments
fankromank555
fankromank555

Im not surpriised. we can blame corporate America for this for underpaying employees.


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Matthew Clemens
Matthew Clemens

Well thats what happens when your state has a high number of illegals and nobody will kick them out...

Robert Johnston
Robert Johnston

yay more poor people in this sad Right to Work (for less) State. Good job Republicans!

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

Although the article states "Arizonans" and "Americans", do the statistics include people who are not legal residents?

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@fankromank555 


"underpaying" is a subjective judgment.  Our economy is founded on  capitalism and driven by supply and demand.

Employees are paid what they are worth as determined by the market.  

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

You think illegals join unions?

annarkey14
annarkey14

@fishingblues 

Although I have to agree that there's a big difference between Arizonans and Americans, what difference does legal status make?

The fact that you ask illustrates the difference.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@fishingblues 

Since the data is from the U.S. Census Bureau, yes.

They don't distinguish between citizens and non-citizens in any of their counts.


valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@annarkey14 @fishingblues 

It helps us to understand the reasons for the demographic change, which could lead to policy changes that might reduce the number of people living in poverty in Arizona.


Don't you think that's important?

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@annarkey14 


I believe it should be reported accurately.  If people are not legal residents, they are also not Arizona residents (Arizonans) or obviously American residents (**Americans).

(Americans, in this context are meant to mean citizens of the US.)


Decisions will be made, laws will be constructed and enacted, taxes will be raised.  I believe the American people should be given the facts so that they can make intelligent decisions when they vote.  Do you now see the difference and do you think it prudent to give the people the real facts?  

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