University of Arizona Banning Smoking on Campus, Including E-Cigarettes

Categories: News
e-cig-smoking-lady.jpg
michaeldorausch.com


The University of Arizona will be joining hundreds of other universities across the country with a campus ban on smoking.

UA's "Smoking and Tobacco Policy" also includes a ban on using electronic cigarettes on campus.

See also:
-ASU to Ban Smoking on all Campuses in 2013

Arizona State University enacted a similar no-tobacco policy last year -- to the protest of some students -- but its policy allows the use of e-cigarettes on the campus:
E-cigarettes produce indoor air pollutants and have a heating element which can serve as a source of ignition. They are therefore prohibited indoors and near any area with combustible materials. E-cigarettes can be used outdoors on campus away from combustible materials.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ". . . e-cigarettes appear to have far fewer of the toxins found in smoke compared to traditional cigarettes, [but] the impact of e-cigarettes on long-term health must be studied."

The CDC says one in five U.S. adult smokers has tried an e-cigarette, with some using them as a replacement for traditional cigarettes, and some using them as a tool to help quit cigarette smoking.

Starting next month, they can't be used on UA property, though:
For purposes of this Policy, prohibited products include any product that contains tobacco or nicotine, including but not limited to any lighted or unlighted cigarette, e-cigarette, cigar, pipe, bidi, kretek, hookah or water pipe, and all forms of smokeless tobacco. This Policy does not apply to nicotine patches, nasal sprays or nicotine gum.
However, UA's policy regarding the punishment for using an e-cigarette, or any other tobacco product, is vague:
  • Students will be referred to the appropriate college student representative for educational resources.
  • Employees, affiliates, associates, and volunteers will be referred to their respective supervisors for appropriate action.
  • Contractors will be referred to their respective employers and/or Procurement and Contracting Services for appropriate action.
  • Visitors may be required to leave the campus if they fail to conform to the Policy
ASU's outlined punishment is also vague:
Students and employees are required to abide by all university policies in their day-to-day activities at ASU. If a student or an employee violates this policy, they may face disciplinary action.
The Maricopa County Community College District actually enacted a smoking/tobacco ban on its campuses in 2012, including a ban on e-cigarettes, too.

Northern Arizona University's smoking policy doesn't ban smoking outside of buildings on campus property.

UA's new ban goes into effect on August 15.

Got a tip? Send it to: Matthew Hendley.

Follow Valley Fever on Twitter at @ValleyFeverPHX.
Follow Matthew Hendley at @MatthewHendley.



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14 comments
megidi
megidi

I think this is bullshit. Tobacco bans are one thing, but bans on anything containing nicotine are just stupid. Why aren't patches and gum included? Or only vaping because people get their panties in a twist. It's irrelevant because this is virtually non-enforceable anyway.

I am at ASU with a similar ban, although vaping is allowed. But people still openly smoke. The administration has to file the complaint, and there is no way they know all 70,000 students. So there are two ways you can be cited for violating the policy.

1) A student wishes to file a complaint. In which case they ask you for your full name or student ID. You then tell them to go fuck themselves and walk away. I once saw a student get so enraged by another students smoke that he demanded ID immediately, and quite aggressively. He almost got knocked the hell out.

2) Faculty wishes to file a complaint. In which case they will ask for ID or a full name. You simply tell them to fuck off, and walk away. They can not do a thing about it.

Contrary to what the university published the ASU Police Department CAN NOT stop someone for violating the policy as smoking on campus is not a crime. Law enforcement, regardless of who signs their pay checks can not enforce policy.

So great U of A. Nice fluff piece so you can tell the newspapers you give a shit about their students health. But it is a largely unenforceable policy that will change nothing.

dwright
dwright

The ASUA Student Body already has voted on a total smoking ban multiple times, and we suspect the issue will arise again. That’s fine. However, the current administration (i.e. President Ann Weaver Hart), wishes to sidestep the issue and go behind the student body’s back and implement a complete Tobacco free policy on her own, without consulting the students who pay their salaries.

susan1972
susan1972

I wonder about the merits of an outdoor smoking ban in the first place. About seven years ago, the indoor smoking ban BARELY passed with 52% of the vote. If an indoor ban barely passes, why would we be trying to ban a legal product outside so soon after? U of A administrators argue it’s to prevent non-smokers from the hazards of second-hand smoke, but hard evidence is lacking on second-hand smoke *outside*:


“I discovered the evidence was really weak,” explained lead author Ronald Bayer, a professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “The evidence of harm to non-smokers on the beach or in a park from someone smoking is virtually non-existent.”


Source:http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/the-real-reasons-behind-public-smoking-bans/


Some might argue that the smoking ban is to protect the health of the smoker. If that’s the case, then the university should remove all fast-food restaurants from the Student Union. Why not ban cars on campus as well. That would clear up the air and eliminate countless accidents. In fact, one car produces way more carbon monoxide in a day than a smoker who smokes one pack.


Even if this policy is implemented, the proposal is flawed and does not differentiate between tobacco products that produce actual smoke and those that do not:


"For purposes of this Policy, prohibited products include any product that contains tobacco or nicotine, including but not limited to any lighted or unlighted cigarette, e-cigarette, cigar, pipe, bidi, kretek, hookah or water pipe, and all forms of smokeless tobacco. This Policy does not apply to nicotine patches, nasal sprays or nicotine gum."


E-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco produce no secondhand smoke. Many people use e-cigarettes for smoking cessation - in fact, studies are starting to show they work better than the patch. I’ve seen many people buy the 0 mg e-cig refills (read: water) because they just need the oral fixation. The smoking ban is outrageous, but the e-cig ban is even more outrageous.

davelog
davelog

"For purposes of this Policy, prohibited products include any product that contains tobacco or nicotine, including but not limited to any lighted or unlighted cigarette, e-cigarette, cigar, pipe, bidi, kretek, hookah or water pipe, and all forms of smokeless tobacco. This Policy does not apply to nicotine patches, nasal sprays or nicotine gum."

So say goodbye to tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes, cauliflower, peppers and tea - they're all products that contain the dreaded nicotine.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

What about e-joints with marijuana extracts? -- for "medical" use only, of course.

eric.nelson745
eric.nelson745 topcommenter

Dang this! I blame it all on Barack Hussein Osama. I'll shoot the first person who tries to tell me I can't smoke in public! Great J.T. Ready's ghost! Death to all those libtards! Right, Jaffy?

WhoKnows
WhoKnows topcommenter

As ASU is state property, I'm not sure how they can ban smoking outside, as long as the distances conform with state law.  "we the people" own the property after all.

davelog
davelog

@susan1972 

0mg refills are not water - they are, however, comprised entirely of components approved by the FDA as GRAS (generally regarded as safe). The propylene glycol and vegetable glycerin that make up the vast majority of e-liquid are even FDA approved for inhalation.

Nicotine patches, sprays, and gum get a free pass because they are FDA approved. Never mind that they're wildly ineffective. The FDA's not backing electronic cigarettes because they directly compete with - and have a significantly higher success rate than - Big Pharma's offerings in the same arena. It's not about public health, it's about money.


Policies like these show where the true motivation lies.

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@davelog


Damn, does that mean I can't take my eggplant on campus anymore?

megidi
megidi

The ABOR and University are given specific right by Arizona State law that allows them to make rules that any other municipality in the state would not be able to do.

For instance no city in the state can ban the possession of firearms. It can actually result in the city council (or whoever enforces or implements that rule) losing their job and paying some significant fines. However a university (which is essentially a municipality by most legal definitions) can ban firearms because state law says they have the right to make those specific policy decisions.

marcy
marcy

@WhoKnows


We the people own the Washington Monument as well, doesn't mean you can bring a sleeping bag and camp out in "your" property.


You also own the Supreme Court building so whey not show up in shorts and flip-flops and demand they let you in.


The government is allowed to set rules for use of public property as long as those rules don't violate your rights, and smoking in public isn't a protected right.



davelog
davelog

@fishingblues @davelog 

It actually means that sweeping bans are idiotic, especially when the people enacting them don't realize what all it entails.

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