Phoenix's Parking Meter Plan: Extend Hours, Raise and Lower Rates

Categories: News
phoenix-skyline-night.jpg
Alan Stark


The City of Phoenix wants to squeeze between $1 million and $2 million more per year out of parking meters, and the city's transportation department has some ideas.

The Street Transportation Department has issued an explainer on its ideas for changes to the parking meters, which includes proposals to make the meters active on nights and weekends, and to raise the price in some situations, and lower it in others.

See also:
-2010: Phoenix Parking-Ticket Fees Rise Dramatically

Explaining that, "Almost all major cities in the United States have evening and weekend metered parking," the city wants Phoenix to hop on that train. Currently, you can park at a meter for free after 5 p.m., at any time on the weekend, and on holidays.

The explanation on that:
Parking meters have worked effectively during weekday business hours, providing access for visitors and creating turnover for businesses. However, after 5 p.m. weekdays and on weekends, the most visible and convenient spaces are occupied by longer-term parking which slows user turnover to a crawl. Most business patrons who arrive during these periods either have to circulate within the area to find a less convenient on-street parking space or parking in off-street/parking garages. This may discourage patrons from traveling downtown to dine, attend shows and events in the evenings or on weekends. By extending parking meter hours, greater parking turn-over would be created along valuable on-street spaces to support increased downtown activity. The same space that now holds just one car will be able to serve three or more customers during these periods.
Then there are the proposed price changes, with dynamic pricing at meters near venues. Around the office buildings downtown, the city has no plans to change the rate from $1.50 an hour. Near venues, like U.S. Airways, for example, the price would range from $0.50 per hour to $6 per hour, depending on the existence of special events.

Here's the explanation on that:
The city is considering plans to implement demand-based pricing for special events to encourage parking turn-over in valuable on-street spaces next to venues. Due to the long-term parking use of these spaces after 5 p.m., recent studies show that only a fraction (15%) of the 500 on-street parking meters in the core downtown area are available for major event goers who are attending evening events (6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. starts). Since many of these on-street parking spaces are next to restaurants, retail, and other establishments, this lessens opportunities for these businesses to capture "pass-by" trade from event goers. By encouraging turnover in these parking spaces during special event periods, many more event-goers may frequent the adjacent businesses before and after the events.
The city's actually considering lowering rates on meters in "peripheral downtown areas," which aren't used as much, and allowing them to be used in 10- to 14-hour stretches.

The city hosted a couple of public-comment sessions on the proposed changes yesterday, but the city council won't be deciding on changes until its June 18 council meeting.

Got a tip? Send it to: Matthew Hendley.

Follow Valley Fever on Twitter at @ValleyFeverPHX.
Follow Matthew Hendley at @MatthewHendley.


My Voice Nation Help
18 comments
MarkW
MarkW

What a way to discourage people to come into Phoenix for a night on the town. Because Phoenix officials can't manage their money they expect area residents to make up the difference of their mismanagement of revenue. I feel sorry for downtown Phoenix businesses who will loose customers because of this bad decision.

Mark 

lippyrat
lippyrat

There are no downtown restaurants, bars, or other venues that are so "can't-miss" that I would be willing to pay to park to patronize them. There are too many such venues closer to home or elsewhere with free parking. Good job reinforcing downtown's reputation as an afterhours ghost town, Phoenix.

james8394
james8394

I recently parked at a meter on 1st ave at Clarendon at mid day. Had to use a credit card. Cost over $2.50 for the 15 minutes I needed to be there. I could have taken transit for less. Scheduling conflict or I would have done so. 

john043012
john043012 topcommenter

This will drive business away for sure I feel sorry for the few restaurants who are open at night think about it having to spend who knows what on any given night just to park and pickup a pizza or go to Walgreens will only drive business away.

The mayor and his ilk are douche bag Democrats to say the least

pecee69
pecee69

Do these idiots even realise in their own city that for special events all their parking meters are hooded and padlocked to force downtown visitors into private parking garages. Those hoods stay on until someone feels like removing them............lots of wasted revenue right there.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@james8394

So it's working, making people consider alternate transportation.  Good to know.

 

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@john043012 

The idea is to make more parking spaces available, by driving away the people who park overnight.  That's good for the local businesses, not bad.  It's better to make customers pay a buck to park than to have them give up trying to find a place to park, at all.

eric.nelson745
eric.nelson745 topcommenter

@john043012 Do you agree that something has to be done and if so, what? Calling the mayor a db doesn't solve any problem.

john043012
john043012 topcommenter

@pecee69 That only happens if there is a street fair or something similar, downtown phoenix is a ghost town after 6pm and even if there is a ballgame or basketball game as soon as its over people either get on the train or go to their vehicles and bolt out of there. This so called city has absolutely no night life . Even when we have a convention the people attending them have to take a taxi out of there and go somewhere else in-order to have some fun they roll up the sidewalks at 6pm nightly taxi's are lined up at the hotels waiting to take convention goers to other parts of Phoenix ,Tempe or where ever

john043012
john043012 topcommenter

@valleynative Cooper square really isn't that big we have parking garages all over downtown they are owned by the city. Parking in them coats 12.00 regardless if there is an event going on or not. The convention center was a hugh mistake its costing a butt load of money for up keep and labor costs. Our Mayor and his cronies have allowed a bunch of blue hair derelicts dictate the atmosphere surrounding that area of the city that's why its a ghost town after 6pm . Go to Symphony Hall or the Orpheum theater on a Sunday if you would like to get a cup of coffee or ice cream forget it mostly every establishment is closed . We need to bring in city planner's from other states and sell the convention center for 1 dollar to a company who specializes in entertainment and has an incentive to make a profit. That's how you fix this problem raising parking meter rates wont.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@john043012 

Like everything else in the Valley, the night life is distributed, not all localized downtown. Some of us think that's a good thing.  Crowds and traffic jams define the sort of city you seem to want.


john043012
john043012 topcommenter

I meant copper square and the issue is a 32 million dollar shortfall in the budgit

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@66rock @valleynative @john043012 

One of the benefits of the distribution is that people who are looking for different types of fun don't have to deal with each other's traffic or compete for parking. For example, there's nothing in Tempe or Scottsdale that interests me.


Now Trending

Phoenix Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

General

Home

Loading...