John McCain, Jeff Flake Help Block Vote on Minimum Wage Increase

Categories: News
mccain-flake-top.jpg
Gage Skidmore


Arizona's Republican U.S. senators, John McCain and Jeff Flake, helped kill Democrats' proposal to increase the federal minimum wage in a procedural vote today.

Their votes weren't exactly surprising, as only one Republican senator voted with the Democrats to proceed with the bill.

The bill, which would raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour (Arizona's is $7.90 an hour), has had heavy backing from President Obama, who gave a speech at the White House today blasting Republicans from letting the bill go forward:
After 14 months since I've called on Congress to reward the hard work of millions of Americans like the ones who we have here today to raise the federal minimum wage, we saw this morning a majority of senators saying "yes," but almost every Republican saying "no" to giving America a raise.

They blocked a bill -- sponsored by Senator Tom Harkin and Congressman George Miller, who is right here in front. A bill that would have gradually raised the minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour. By preventing even a vote on this bill, they prevented a raise for 28 million hardworking Americans. They said no to helping millions work their way out of poverty -- and keep in mind, this bill would have done so without any new taxes, or spending, or bureaucracy. They told Americans like the ones who are here today that "you're on your own" -- without even looking them in the eye.

We know these Americans. We depend on them. The workers who'd benefit from a minimum wage increase often work full-time, often in physically demanding jobs. They average 35 years of age. Most low-paying jobs are held by women. But because Republicans in Congress said "no" to even allowing a vote on the floor of the Senate, these folks are going to have to wait for the raise they deserve.
Obama said Democrats in Congress would keep fighting the minimum-wage issue, and also asked people to lobby their congressmen to support reinstatement of recently cut unemployment benefits.

You may recall during the 2008 presidential race that then-vice presidential candidate Joe Biden blasted McCain for voting against the minimum wage 19 times at that point.

McCain later responded by saying that he's for a living wage for all Americans, and, "I'm for the minimum wage increases when they are not attached to other big-spending pork barrel."

The text of the bill (which can be found here, and doesn't take more than two minutes to read) doesn't include any "pork."

Flake, on the other hand, has spoken out against minimum-wage increases before, so his vote is even less surprising.

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184 comments
Loran Rodewald
Loran Rodewald

Republicans still support Slavery and Big Tobacco. Why expect them to be fair on the minimum wage for working people?!?!

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

.Research Shows Minimum Wage Increases Do Not Cause Job Loss

Extensive research refutes the claim that increasing the minimum wage causes increased unemployment and business closures. (See list below.)

The buying power of the minimum wage reached its peak in 1968 at $10.74, adjusting for inflation in 2013 dollars. The unemployment rate went from 3.8% in 1967 to 3.6% in 1968 to 3.5% in 1969. The next time the unemployment rate came close to those levels was after the minimum wage raises of 1996 and 1997. 
Business Week observed in 2001, “Many economists have backed away from the argument that minimum wage [laws] lead to fewer jobs.”

Numerous states raised their minimum wages higher than the federal level during the 1997-2007 period the federal minimum wage remained stuck at $5.15. Research by the Fiscal Policy Institute and others showed that states that raised their minimum wages above the federal level experienced better employment and small business trends than states that did not.

A series of rigorous studies by the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at the University of California, Berkeley, significantly advances the research on minimum wage employment effects.
Minimum Wage Effects Across State Borders compared all neighboring counties in the U.S. located on different sides of a state border with different minimum wage levels between 1990 and 2006 and found no adverse employment effects from higher minimum wages.

The Institute for Research on Labor and Employment’s
Spacial Heterogeneity and Minimum Wages: Employment Estimates for Teens Using Cross-State Commuting Zonesfound “no discernable disemployment effect, even when minimum wage increases lead to relatively large wage changes.” Do Minimum Wages Really Reduce Teen Employment?analyzed the 1990-2009 period (an earlier version analyzed 1990-2007). Carefully controlling for more factors than previous minimum wage studies, the researchers found the answer is no.

In a 2013 report,
Why Does the Minimum Wage Have No Discernible Effect on Employment?, the Center for Economic and Policy Research spotlights two recent meta-studies analyzing the extensive research conducted since the early 1990s; they conclude that "the minimum wage has little or no discernible effect on the employment prospects of low-wage workers. The most likely reason for this outcome is that the cost shock of the minimum wage is small relative to most firms' overall costs and only modest relative to the wages paid to low-wage workers." The Center report explores varied means of adjustment by employers such as increased worker productivity and diminished wage gap between lower and higher paid employees, noting, "But, probably the most important channel of adjustment is through reductions in labor turnover, which yield significant cost savings to employers."

Bruce Salvage
Bruce Salvage

Ok lets see.Republicans discriminate against gays,women and minorities.Dont want a livable wage or even a decent minimum wage,Dont want any background checks for guns,Dont want any of those pesky regulations or inspections on corporations that produce food,medicine,Wall Street and Banking,auto/plane industries etc..Wont stop cutting grade school education budgets,always want war somewhere in the world,and want poor people without medical insurance to hurry up and die as the republican health care plan..Am i leaving anything out?? So tell me again,WHY do people vote republican again?? Other than hating the black man obama i mean..

danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

absolutely hysterical. the people everybody is turning to  for a minimum wage increase from (because of the high cost of living) are the ones who have made the cost of living unbearable. blaming the employers because they have a hard time surviving (your boss is having a hard time keeping the doors open too) when its the government taking its lions share that is the root of the problem. if you own a gas station and have a kid cutting your grass for minimum wage, you are giving him a job..........out of your pocket. when the government comes in and says pay him more, you have to raise your gas prices. the kid cant afford the gas so he needs the government to step in and get him more money. again you have to raise your prices to pay that kid, again he cant afford it. at what point do you think the gas station owner just says "never mind, i will cut it myself, if i dont, i have to raise my gas prices" and all that time, the gas station owner and the kid pay more and more to the government.................the same people who created the whole mess

Jeff Kee
Jeff Kee

Voter will remember this. If your poor, Republican don't care about you and they are controlled by rich oligarchs. Republican keeping the poor people poor, slaves labor on government assistance, and keeping people in lifelong overwhelming debt. Pay people more so they can rely on less government assistance.

Sean Secord
Sean Secord

cost of living goes up, your pay should go up as well! its only the right logic!

Vince Rafferty
Vince Rafferty

$10 an hour minimum wage would bring $6 a gallon milk .... simple economics folks

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

The ignorance and covetousness displayed on this thread is nearly unbelievable.  I guess this is how we get people like Obama elected.  "Entitlement mentality",  "It's all about ME mentality", "persecution complex", "class envy" "greed".  It is also quite disturbing.  It seems our country is being overrun by these whiners.  They keep voting for what they can get for nothing instead of what is good for the country.  Our country is deteriorating so rapidly, I may see it collapse in my lifetime.


VN:  Once again I marvel at your patience.  Your answers are excellent.     

Kevin Apellidoprivado
Kevin Apellidoprivado

Not going to state much on this - BUT the wage was not designed to work as a STATIC number while real life society experiences inflation - as the cost of EVERYTHING else goes up, so should the wage. Otherwise it is literally meaningless in preventing the "abuse" you speak of but clearly can not see is exactly what this wage permits.

Anders Dominick Berg
Anders Dominick Berg

Pete, I'm not preaching Gospel and I don't mean to use personal attacks, I jumped on the defensive when you stated I missed points. I omitted points, but I didn't miss the mark on anything I said. Small businesses will suffer. I am about to offer anecdotal evidence that I realize is fundamentally flawed but I am making a point. I come from a family of self employed business owners that at times scraped by to make ends meet (my father owned a janitorial company and my mother was a nurse consultant). I know that there were years when any additional bills would have caused the closure of their business. The few hundreds to several thousands of dollars will strain small business owners and is not the answer. That is one of the foundations of being American and it is at risk. I served in the military to afford college and have made many sacrifices in order to get a well paying job. I have worked very hard to get to where I am. I started as a programmer at $15 an hour. Should a high school drop out stocking shelves make the same as someone that served in the military and went on to graduate college? I don't think so. Are their skills more valuable than mine? I don't think so. That is not fair either. If they don't want to stock shelves then get an education, join the military, study for a certificate, go to trade school, do something. I realize there are exceptions, but the truth is that most people are working minimum wage jobs because they aren't willing to do the extra (hard) work and make the necessary sacrifices. I have no empathy for that mentality. Complacency shouldn't be rewarded. This is my opinion. I may very well be wrong - truth is nobody knows what will happen until at least a decade from now. It may work out splendid, it may not. I personally do not support hand outs that are not earned (which is my opinion on what this is).

Michelle Fischer
Michelle Fischer

So basically, there's no way to increase pay to people working? They spend money, increase demand, lower prices. That's how it works. The way that you say- the increase prices, isn't how it actually plays out. Not in historical studies or future predicts. It's only what people imagine, because we are being told that it makes sense. We are told that it makes sense too, that giving tax breaks to the wealthy will get them to pay employees. But they don't. And the wealthy will do anything not to pay, including opposing legislation telling them to. Giving them $ doesn't work. The only thing that does, is making them pay.

Anders Dominick Berg
Anders Dominick Berg

So you're saying that small businesses do not employ minimum wage employees? No tanning salons, hardware stores, corner markets, book stores, clothing stores, hobby shops, ice cream parlors, small firms, etc.? So we should cripple the small businesses so that Walmart has to pay their employees more? Walmart will be okay, what happens to the thousands of small businesses out there?

Pete Gitlin
Pete Gitlin

OK Anders...so resorting to personal attacks (must be retarded) and implied attacks (...with the exception of those under educated under achieving types) doesn't really do a lot for your argument...other than to shine a light on your thought process and degree of compassion for your fellow human beings. In any case, and attempting to keep the conversation civil, you state many opinions which we are supposed to take as Gospel. I don't believe that raising the minimum wage is a panacea for all economic ills, but there are many, like me (see below), who believe that the overall effect on the economy will be strongly positive. There is a fascinating experiment about to occur, as Seattle just today raised the minimum wage to $15.00. We'll see how that impacts business, small and large, in their community. By the way the $15.00 number came about not by governmental decree, but as part of negotiations with all sectors (government, business, labor) in the mix. In any case...keep the conversation polite as, believe it or not, you don't have the exclusive right to opinions or thoughtful interpretations of economic policy. http://www.usnews.com/opinion/economic-intelligence/2014/02/21/raising-the-minimum-wage-has-many-benefits

Lori Sander Boucher
Lori Sander Boucher

Disagree, they say the same thing EVERY time only to be proven wrong! Fact is it helps the economy and they are against progress. The CEO's wages have tripled (without economic impact) while employees' wages have stayed the same. They're pissing on your head and telling u it's raining!

Stephanie Campbell
Stephanie Campbell

cost of living has gone up. period. minimum wage has not. period. they've earned it. period.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Selected Research in chronological order


Lawrence F. Katz and Alan B. Krueger, “The Effect of the Minimum Wage on the Fast Food Industry,” Industrial Relations Section, Princeton University, February 1992.


David Card, “Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure the Effects of the Federal Minimum Wage,” Industrial and Labor Relations Review, October 1992.


David Card and Alan Krueger, Myth and Measurement: The New Economics of the Minimum Wage (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995).


David Card and Alan B. Krueger, “Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania: Reply,” American Economic Review, December 2000 (in this reply, Card and Krueger update earlier findings and refute critics).


Jared Bernstein and John Schmitt, Economic Policy Institute, Making Work Pay: The Impact of the 1996-97 Minimum Wage Increase, 1998.


Jerold Waltman, Allan McBride and Nicole Camhout, “Minimum Wage Increases and the Business Failure Rate,” Journal of Economic Issues, March 1998.


A Report by the National Economic Council, The Minimum Wage: Increasing the Reward for Work, March 2000.


Holly Sklar, Laryssa Mykyta and Susan Wefald, Raise The Floor: Wages and Policies That Work For All Of Us (Boston: South End Press, 2001/2002), Ch. 4 and pp. 102-08.


Marilyn P. Watkins, Economic Opportunity Institute, “Still Working Well: Washington’s Minimum Wage and the Beginnings of Economic Recovery,” January 21, 2004.


Amy Chasanov, Economic Policy Institute, No Longer Getting By: An Increase in the Minimum Wage is Long Overdue, May 2004.


Fiscal Policy Institute, States with Minimum Wages above the Federal Level Have Had Faster Small Business and Retail Job Growth, March 2006 (update of 2004 report).


John Burton and Amy Hanauer, Center for American Progress and Policy Matters Ohio,Good for Business: Small Business Growth and State Minimum Wages, May 2006.


Paul K. Sonn, Citywide Minimum Wage Laws: A New Policy Tool for Local Governments, (originally published by Brennan Center for Justice) National Employment Law Project, May 2006, includes a good summary of impact research.


Liana Fox, Economic Policy Institute, Minimum Wage Trends: Understanding past and contemporary research, November 8, 2006.


Paul Wolfson, Economic Policy Institute, State Minimum Wages: A Policy That Works, November 27, 2006.


Arindrajit Dube, Suresh Naidu and Michael Reich, “The Economic Effects of a Citywide Minimum Wage,” Industrial & Labor Relations Review, July 2007.


Jerold L. Waltman, Minimum Wage Policy in Great Britain and the United States (New York: Algora, 2008), pp. 17-19, 132-136, 151-162, 178-180.


Sylvia Allegretto, Arindrajit Dube and Michael Reich, Do Minimum Wages Really Reduce Teen Employment?, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Univ. of CA, Berkeley, June 28, 2008.


Michael F. Thompson, Indiana Business Research Center, “Minimum Wage Impacts on Employment: A Look at Indiana, Illinois and Surrounding Midwestern States,” Indiana Business Review, Fall 2008.


Hristos Doucouliagos and T. D. Stanley, "Publication Selection Bias in Minimum-Wage Research? A Meta-Regression Analysis," British Journal of Industrial Relations, vol. 47, no. 2, 2009.


Sylvia Allegretto, Arindrajit Dube and Michael Reich, Spacial Heterogeneity and Minimum Wages: Employment Estimates for Teens Using Cross-State Commuting ZonesInstitute for Research on Labor and Employment, Univ. of CA, Berkeley, June 25, 2009.


Arindrajit Dube, T. William Lester and Michael Reich, Minimum Wage Effects Across State Borders: Estimates Using Contiguous Counties, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Univ. of CA, Berkeley, August 2008.


John Schmitt and David Rosnick, The Wage and Employment Impact of Minimum‐Wage Laws in Three Cities, Center for Economic and Policy Research, March 2011.


Sylvia Allegretto, Arindrajit Dube and Michael Reich, Do Minimum Wages Really Reduce Teen Employment? Accounting for Heterogeneity and Selectivity in State Panel Data,Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Univ. of CA, Berkeley, June 21, 2010.


Anne Thompson, What Is Causing Record-High Teen Unemployment? Range of Economic Factors Drives High Teen Unemployment, But Minimum Wage Not One of Them, National Employment Law Project, October 2011.


John Schmidt, Why Does the Minimum Wage Have No Discernible Effect on Employment?, Center for Economic and Policy Research, Febuary 2013.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

If the best you can do is a minimum wage job, it's not the Republicans who are keeping you poor.


danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

yes, the cost of living goes up, so pay should go up. however...........if the government says you have to pay entry level people more (whether or not they are worth it) your prifit margin lessens and overhead increases. when that happens you have to raise the cost of your service or product to maintain a profit margin. when the price goes up...........everyone cries that they cant survive and the government intervenes again. its a vicious circle that will never decrease only increase. if people cant earn their own incentives, bonuses or raises and the government mandates them...................why bother trying harder? if you thought people had a hard time making ends meet before.......just wait, the cycle will start all over again very quickly...........high cost of living, minimum wage increase, higher overhead, higher cost of living, minimum wage increase, higher overhead, higher cost of living......................and so on and so on

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

... then your purchasing parity has remained the same, and you're not moving ahead.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

That should be between you, your boss, and whoever else you can find to hire you.  The government has no business getting involved.


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

... so stop drinking the lactate excrement of bovine animals.


danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

@fishingblues  not only will you see the collapse in your lifetime...............you could be dying of cancer and would still probably get to see it

danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

there are more cars on the road than there were in the 60's. more people are buying cars, and people are making more money.................so why isnt gas .50 a gallon????   we spend more money, demand has increased..........yet oddly enough, car prices and gas are through the roof.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

So they lied to me in my economics classes?  The bastards!

They told us that when people have more money to spend, but they're not being more productive, prices go up, and yes, that sure as hell does make sense.


fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay  


You don't seriously believe people read the crap you post, do you stinky?  

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@valleynative  ... if your job is at risk from some uneducated Jose que no habla inglés and can perform it as good or better than you -- at any price -- then it's not immigration that's your problem.



DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@danzigsdaddy  ... 


HipTip: stop talking when you have no clue as to what you're yammering about.


Take a Macro-Economics class, then take it again until you comprehend it.



DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@valleynative  


"Local government have the obligation to regulate business practices"

-- ValleyNative

danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

@valleynative  wow............i dont know where she came up with things costing less when it costs more to make stuff. if you make more money, it has to come from somewhere, it doesnt just magically appear in your bosses pocket

fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay @fishingblues


 Well now stinky, you ridicule people for their use of jargon (idiotic, juvenile shit like "prolly" for example - and rightfully so).  But you use the same idiotic juvenile jargon - "teatard" or "repuglykkkan". 


You are a stinky little hypocrite, aren't you?  


What is truly hilarious, because of your blind hate for either the Tea Party or Republicans, you treat it as a pejorative and apply it to everyone with which you disagree (which is nearly everyone). 


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@fishingblues <== dumber than a bucket of dirt.


Really stupid dirt.


Typical Teatard Repuglykkkan.


fishingblues
fishingblues topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay @fishingblues  


So, the answer is yes?  You are arrogant enough to think people actually listen to you. 


You tilt so far so the left, you have fallen over and hit your head.  Dude, you are not even rational.


So, after I declared you TOO OBTUSE TO BE OF USE", you actually looked it up in a dictionary and now try to use it in a sentence. Gosh, just like I remember from second grade.  


Keep trying stinky.   

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@fishingblues ... typical Repug, too lazy and obtuse to learn the truth, cowers behind his own abject ignorance, bigotry and hatred.


Stay ignorant, fistingblues, it's your only skill.



DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@danzigsdaddy ... you still have no idea what you're yammering about, you simplistic dolt.


Read a book, or have someone with a brain read it to you, learn some basic macro-economics, realize that entry-level minimum wage employees only make up a small fraction of the overall workforce, and the economic impacts of paying them a little more $$ have an overall positive benefit on the economy as a whole, which benefits the companies they work for with increased market / sales / prices.


Seriously, your C-student Jr. High School brain is perfect for the Repuglykan party you've aligned yourself with.

danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay if we keep increasing the wages of entry level employees without them earning their higher pay through skills and experience, we will also have to increase the wages of those with skills and experience to stay competitive or they will leave. when we increase their pay as well as the entry level but are not getting more experience of skill with that cost, we have to raise our prices to compensate for those new higher wages. the money doesnt just magically appear, it comes out of our profit. when profit is down lay offs or downsizing occurs. the millions you say will be spent have to come from somewhere. someone has to be earning that money that the entry level will earn and that would be their employers. the employers earn that money by setting their cost to offset their expenses, expenses like payroll for entry level employees and the rest of their employees. the costs that the employers set are met by the consumers who have to go out and earn more money to meet those costs..........and you dont see a vicious circle in there?

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@danzigsdaddy ... your clueless ignorance makes the Repuglycan party perfect for you.


HipTip: if Millions of Minimum Wage earners have MILLIONS more $$ to spend due to increased wages, then ... they ... will ... --wait for it ... here .... it .... comes! -- SPEND more $$ into the economy ...


.... BUYING those BigMacs and Chinese imports that Walmart sells.


Does it hurt to be so stupid?



danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay holy shit...i got it!!! thank you for pointing out economics for me. walmart and mcdonalds arent job creators................they are profit whores!! if we shut them down because they wont pay a higher wage we will stimulate the economy by adding hundreds of thousands to the ranks of the unemployed. if we eliminate the profit margin that influences expansion of business............we are helping the economy by preventing new job openings..........................yep, your way makes much more sense

danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

@fishingblues that was rude.............Donkey was going to tell us how to stay in business by paying your employees more and not raising the price of your product or service and still maintain a profit margin. it must be one hell of an answer since nobody else can figure out how to do that

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@valleynative ... so the Repuglykkkan / Teatard solution is to not have schools bother to teach those slacker 1st graders ?



valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay @valleynative 

Yes, that's also true.  But, on the other hand, when over 50% of incoming first graders have never had an English language book read to them, so our schools have to struggle to teach them to read, that's immigration.


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 @danzigsdaddy


Earlier this year, Economics Policy Institute released an analysis of the Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2013, a bill introduced by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) and Rep. George Miller (D-Calif.) that would raise the federal minimum wage in three incremental increases of $0.95 from its current level of $7.25 per hour to $10.10 per hour (see Cooper and Hall 2013). 


The Harkin-Miller proposal would then index the minimum wage to inflation, so that as prices rise in subsequent years, the minimum would automatically be adjusted to preserve its real value. At the same time, the bill would raise the base wage paid to tipped workers from the current $2.13 per hour—where it has stood since 1991—in incremental increases over six years until it equals 70 percent of the full minimum wage.


Since that analysis was released, five states have raised their state minimum wages: California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island.


The increases in these states underscore the broad recognition that the current federal minimum wage is too low. These increases slightly alter our earlier estimates of the impact of a federal minimum-wage increase to $10.10 because workers in these states who would have been affected by the federal increase will now have higher wages as a result of their higher state minimums. 


Yet the conclusion of our previous analysis remains unchanged: Raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 would lift incomes for millions of American workers and provide a modest boost to U.S. GDP. 


Key findings include:

  • Raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 would return the federal minimum wage to roughly the same inflation-adjusted value it had in the late 1960s.
  • An increase to $10.10 would either directly or indirectly raise the wages of 27.8 million workers, who would receive about $35 billion in additional wages over the phase-in period.
  • Across the phase-in period of the increase, GDP would grow by about $22 billion, resulting in the creation of roughly 85,000 net new jobs over that period.
  • The workers who would receive a raise do not fit the stereotypes of low-wage workers:
    • Among affected workers, the average age is 35 years old, nearly 88 percent are at least 20 years old, and more than a third (34.5 percent) are at least 40 years old.
    • Of affected workers, about 54 percent work full time, about 69 percent come from families with family incomes less than $60,000, and more than a quarter have children.
    • The average affected worker earns half of his or her family’s total income.

danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay what do you believe? that if people have to pay their entry level employees more......they will charge less for their product or service? how the hell could you stay in business? you wouldnt.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@valleynative


"Without such regulation to maintain a level playing field, the least scrupulous company would be able to drive their honest competition out of business."  

-- ValleyNative 4/28/14

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@DonkeyHotay @valleynative 

Yes, they do.  Do you think Congress is part of local government?  Do you think that the obligation to regulate means that they should control every aspect?  How stupid are you?

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