Phoenix Animal Hospital Reports More Cases of Pets High on Marijuana

Categories: News
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Robert Hensley


More people have been bringing their pets to Phoenix-area animal hospitals to treat marijuana ingestion, according to a local chain of animal clinics.

According to the Emergency Animal Clinic -- which owns five hospitals across Phoenix, the East Valley, and West Valley -- there's been a pretty sharp increase in such cases over the past few years.

According to the Emergency Animal Clinic, they averaged about six cases a month in 2012, nearly a dozen a month in 2013, and nearly two dozen a month so far this year.

That increase happens to coincide with the opening of medical-marijuana dispensaries in Arizona. Although the voters passed the Medical Marijuana Act in late 2010, due to the regulatory process, the first dispensary didn't open until December 2012.

The company says pets have gotten high from inhaling smoke, eating the dried plant matter, or eating marijuana-infused food products. As you can imagine, these local animal hospitals report seeing more cases of pets eating the marijuana-infused foods, and they're less likely to eat a bag of plant matter.

Reports from other states, including scientific research, indicate that this isn't unique to Arizona.

According to the Emergency Animal Clinic, it's very rare for a pet to die from marijuana exposure, but they can have some negative symptoms:
Signs of marijuana poisoning in dogs and cats include glassy-eyes, stumbling, dilated pupils, vomiting, and coma. Urinary incontinence or urine dribbling is also very common, especially in dogs. Serious effects include changes in heart rate, coma, tremors, and seizures. Effects can be seen for up to 48 hours after ingestion depending on the amount ingested and the size of your pet.
According to one of the Emergency Animal Clinic vets, people have been apprehensive to admit that their pet ingested marijuana, which only draws out the process of diagnosing and treating the animal.

Got a tip? Send it to: Matthew Hendley.

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23 comments
tribune420
tribune420

Poisoning; means, causes death.  This one word makes this story a joke. 

Max Lee
Max Lee

Jesse Erin this sounds like Miss Belle!

James Sutton
James Sutton

People need to keep their "back" medicine to themselves, quit blowing in the pets faces for a laugh.

1959cutter
1959cutter

at todays prices I am unwilling to share any bud with my "best friend"! LOL

dlee23
dlee23

I would like to read some reliable statistics and studies regarding animals being "poisoned" by marijuana before I believe this article. I have read a couple other similar articles elsewhere but all just as vague and with no supporting verifiable evidence.

Before I learned to give a shit many many years ago, as well as when I was making extra cash moving smokable product, I recall quite a few people over the years who got their dogs high, or which ate their stash or infused brownies... I never recall the dogs acting or looking poisoned... In some cases stoned but none of them ever appeared in distress. So I am finding this articles premise to be most likely a salacious interpretation of the biological processes that make a human or a dog stoned. Besides it is possible that like humans, there are dogs who like being stoned, as there are humans that don't care for it and suffer the same symptoms reported by vets in dogs in this article.

These days, I would definitely have harsh words with anyone I observed or who admitted to currently purposely getting their dog high... for the same reason I do not think recreational drugs should be given to children... they don't have the ability to give mature, reasoned, and well informed consent.

Antonio Maldonado
Antonio Maldonado

Just be smart. It's animal abuse if you purposely try to get an animal drunk or high. They don't decide, the human does. They trust us.

Cher Oakley
Cher Oakley

I don't know about ingesting cannabis, but if your pet inhales it, they will be fine. It's medicine, it works the same as it does on a human. is NOT

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

Something to consider whenever you hear statistics like this:


Is it really happening that much more often, or are people more willing to tell their vets what Fluffy ate, now that attitudes are changing?


And, of course, since this is reported from a single source, we can't rule out the possibility that the owner of these clinics is just trying to manipulate public opinion and/or gain some free publicity.



royalphoenix
royalphoenix

My dog vomits a lizard a few times a year. Please show us the next dog or cat that arrives at the veterinarian in a coma from eating cannabis.  Did K. Yee plant this story ? peace

jeanjb
jeanjb

a friend of mine,years ago had his dog eat a couple buds.

he just slept for a couple days and was lethargic.

THC is not toxic to mammals PERIOD! it is used in the treatment of horses as a poltice.  quit trying to fill everyones head with your rightwing bullshit!

shadeaux
shadeaux

Knowingly giving an animal marijuana is animal abuse....Period.


Stupidity is another matter. Pets are like small kids.....everything goes into their mouths so don't leave it where they can get it and don't let them stay in the same area where you are smoking.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

Glancing at the article again, I see that there is corroboration of the increase from other sources, but without seeing the studies, the same questions apply.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@royalphoenix  

This is how drug slang gets started.  In 6 months, we're going to hear people say that they're just going to hang out and maybe vomit a lizard.


dlee23
dlee23

I would love to see some evidence other than anecdotal. It Would help support what I believe to be the case from my own observations.

SerferJoe
SerferJoe

@shadeaux  Not necessarily. Some people give their pets pot or tinctures medicinally. However, remember that other food ingredients can be toxic to pets: chocolate comes to mind. If Fido gets sick after scarfing your brownie, it might not be the pot that's the culprit.

eric.nelson745
eric.nelson745 topcommenter

@shadeaux  Yes. To paraphrase the ch. 10 weatherman, "watch you pets around weed."

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