Glendale Cop, His Dog, and Suspect All Get Shot; Cop Only One to Survive

ronin-glendale-dog.JPG
Glendale PD
Ronin, the Glendale Police Department K9.
An officer-involved shooting Thursday evening in Glendale left bullets in a police officer, his police dog, and the man they were tracking down.

Police spokesmen say they won't be releasing the identities of anyone involved until later today, but the dog and suspect both died, and the cop is in stable condition in a hospital.

According to Glendale PD, police were called to a report of a man trespassing and making threats at a business near 51st Avenue and Orangewood, and when the first officer on the scene tried to get the guy out of the store, he ran away, and hopped a wall into an adjacent neighborhood.

Residents reported the man being armed, even pointing the gun at a homeowner in a failed attempt to get inside.

A citizen pointed officers to a backyard where they just saw the man run, and the K9 officer and his dog found the man hiding under a trampoline.

Police say the dog was "deployed," at which point the suspect pulled a gun, and bullets were exchanged.

All three were shot, and the suspect died after being taken to a hospital, but the officer was taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. The dog died overnight, police say.

Police say information about the cop, his dog, and the suspect will be released later.

UPDATE: 2:41 p.m.: Officer Wes Zygmont, a 13-year veteran with the Glendale Police Department, has been identified as the officer who was shot. He's still hospitalized.

His K9, Ronin, died Thursday at nearly two years old. Ronin, a Belgian Shepherd Malinois, was the newest police dog at the Glendale Police Department.

There also were two other officers on the scene who shot at the suspect, whose name still hasn't been released.

zygmont-ronin.jpg
Glendale PD
Officer Zygmont and Ronin

UPDATE: 2:48 p.m.: The suspect who was killed by officers has been identified as 20-year-old Jourdan Akili Wagner.

jourdan-wagner.jpg
Glendale PD
Jourdan Wagner
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Follow Matthew Hendley on Twitter at @MatthewHendley.


My Voice Nation Help
25 comments
robert_graham
robert_graham

Thank God the suspect is dead!  Now lowlife will never be able to harm anybody again.  His lifeless body should be taken out to the desert and burned.

Comanche_Moon
Comanche_Moon

Police have a very difficult job. Those who do it honorably deserve our respect and support.


marcy
marcy

It's a shame the dog died.

No loss that the worthless punk died.

yourproductsucks
yourproductsucks

I'm not sure what the controversy is on this..the suspect shot at a police officer and his K-9 and was killed...That's what is supposed to happen.  Prayers go out to the officer for a full and speedy recovery.  Being shot in the hand is incredibly painful and potentially career ending.

bgray59
bgray59

Had the homeowner been armed and shot the suspect, A valuable police dog would not have been killed and his partner would not have been injured.

solice
solice

@JoeArpaioFan   Excuse me this was my child maybe that what should happen to u.

jeanjb
jeanjb

@bgray59 or shot by a trigger happy cop!...."oops I thought he was a suspect!"

bgray59
bgray59

@jeanjb @bgray59 Once again had the homeowner shot the ARMED suspect the police dog would not be dead and his partner not been wounded.  

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@jeanjb 

If a cop is chasing a subject who is believed to be armed, there's nothing at all "trigger happy" about shooting an armed man before he can shoot you.  That's just common sense, and if it turns out to be a good guy, then you feel really bad about it, but it's still better than if you thought he was a good guy and were wrong.

Those of us who are armed for self defense take that into account before we decide to unholster.

Sneekr
Sneekr

Just a couple questions, YPS and VN, in your view(s), would it be justifiable for a regular civilian to shoot a police officer (assuming the civilian didn't know it was a police officer and perceived that the officer posed a credible deadly threat) when in actuality the officer posed no real threat (mistaken identity) to the civilian? Would the civilian just get off the hook?

Flyer9753
Flyer9753 topcommenter

@yourproductsucks @Flyer9753  

Well that is plain wrong. An LEO does not have the right to enter private property unless he has evidence or reasonable suspicion that the subject is on that property.

If you have law that states otherwise, post it and your source.

I'll answer yours as soon as you answer mine. I asked first.

Nice edit btw - you are right, you are not obligated to do anything, but your not answering sure does make you look like an idiot.... I guess if you are ok with that, that's your business.

yourproductsucks
yourproductsucks

@Flyer9753 @yourproductsucks A law enforcement officer is not trespassing if they are in pursuit of a trespasser. 

If  a homeowner points and shoots at me I am shooting that homeowner, regardless of his intentions or perceptions of who i may or may not be.   

What "cop" agency did you work for?  Answer the question! I'm not obligated to answer your rants...regardless of the temper tantrum you throw.

Flyer9753
Flyer9753 topcommenter

@yourproductsucks @Flyer9753  

oh I'm so sorry I offended the wanna be language judge that you are..... NOT

IF a person points a gun at you, they are a threat and if YOU OR THE LEO is trespassing, you should feel threatened, but it's an LEO's training that tells him to hold since HE IS THE ONE TRESPASSING IF SEARCHING A PRIVATE PROPERTY.

 I never said that if a person points a gun at you, they are not a credible threat, just the opposite in fact.

You never answered my question the other night about MCSO. Do you work for MCSO or not? Why won't you answer it?

 

yourproductsucks
yourproductsucks

@Flyer9753 If a person points a gun at me, they are a credible threat.  A gun owner has the same responsibility and liability as a police officer when they point a gun at another person, regardless of who the person is. 

Your argument that a "cop" is trespassing when in pursuit of a suspect is ludicrious.  I doubt very seriously that you were a police officer and if you were it was for  a very short period of time and the agency that hired you immediately recitfied their mistake in hiring you.  Real police officers don't refer to other police officers as "cops".

royalphoenix
royalphoenix

@valleynative  So when 10 cops shoot at least 100 rounds at the newspaper carrier from behind, wounding the newspaper carrier, then the chief of police calls it mistaken identity, what the hell is that ?

Flyer9753
Flyer9753 topcommenter

@valleynative @Flyer9753  

An armed man, is not a threat until he points it at you and as a citizen on my own property, confronting what I believe to be a trespasser, I am fully within my rights to point a weapon at a cop.

As a cop with appropriate training it's the cops job to determine if the person is a threat or just the homeowner whose property the cop is currently trespassing on.

If he/she can't do that, they shouldn't be a cop.

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@Flyer9753 @valleynative  

I said an armed man "before he can shoot you", which I expect most people to be able to understand meant that he appeared to be a threat.

Flyer9753
Flyer9753 topcommenter

@valleynative  

I've done that job so I have a lot more experience with 'real world' than you I am sure.

You are right, a cop or civilian that shoots someone and has reasonable grounds to believe the person is a threat to them is self defense

But that's not what you said. You said an 'armed man' you didn't say anything about the officer being threatened and neither did Jeanb. 

We are not talking about self defense of the officer here, since a citizen protecting his/her own property (like in this situation we are talking about) is not a threat to the cop.

The only one wrong here is you, as usual

valleynative
valleynative topcommenter

@Flyer9753 

No, you're mistaken.  As usual.

If a cop or a civilian shoots somebody that they have reasonable grounds to believe is about to shoot them, that's what we call "self-defense"  Cops try really hard to avoid it, and to consider such things as where the guy is coming from, etc, but it's a split-second choice.

The real world isn't like TV.

Flyer9753
Flyer9753 topcommenter

@valleynative @jeanjb  

Oh Bullshit!

LEO's are trained and it's their job to do their job with the utmost respect and attention to civilian safety. That means checking targets before you shoot, which means if a cop were to shoot a homeowner defending themselves or their property, the cop was in the wrong.

That also means that when you are searching a property, you have to be aware that you may have a homeowner come into view that is armed, AS IS THEIR RIGHT, and react appropriately instead of spraying bullets in a trigger happy manner like you are trying to say would just be a "too bad" moment

LEO's accepted those conditions and that responsibility when they became LEO's, if they have a problem carrying out that responsibility to the public, then they should be LEO's

But instead you would just have them shoot and say 'aw shucks' when they hit the wrong target and after it being to late to take the bullet back.

I'm sure you would of course be ok with an officer acting like you state, in your backyard when you meet someone who is trespassing on your land, even after you get shot by that 'trigger happy' cop right??? 

Oh wait, whether or not you are ok with it doesn't matter, since you would be dead and the cop would be saying 'aw shucks'

btw - if YOU are armed for self defense, I fear for every other person on this planet since you clearly have no idea how to handle yourself in a shooting situation. You are more of a danger to the innocent bystander than the crook.

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