Larry King's Corpse: Alcor Life Extensions Won't Say Whether Former CNN Host Has Plans to Freeze Dead Body

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Larry King: not dead.
Contrary to popular belief, former CNN talk show host Larry King isn't a cryogenically frozen corpse...yet.

In a recent CNN special, King says that when he finally does kick the bucket he wants his body to be frozen, which -- with the help of Scottsdale-based Alcor Life Extentions, best-known for allegedly using the frozen head of deceased Boston Red Sox slugger Ted Williams' as a baseball -- is totally doable.

"I want to be frozen on the hope that they'll find whatever I died of and bring me back," King tells a table of celebrities on CNN Presents: A Larry King Special: Dinner with the Kings, which is scheduled to air on Sunday on CNN.

King goes on to joke that he wants to be placed in a state of "suspendered" animation.

Alcor bills itself as "the leader in cryonics (freezing dead bodies)," so it seems like a logical place for a celebrity like King to spend an eternity on ice.

Alcor, however, won't say whether King has any plans with the company to freeze his corpse.

"Alcor policy: we cannot confirm or deny," a company spokesperson tells New Times.

Alcor gives the following explanation of "cryonics":

"Cryonics is a speculative life support technology that seeks to preserve human life in a state that will be viable and treatable by future medicine. It is expected that future medicine will include mature nanotechnology, and the ability to heal at the cellular and molecular levels."

The company came under fire a few years ago when former Alcor executive Larry Johnson wrote a tell-all book about "cryonics," in which he describes how Williams' frozen head was tossed around like a baseball while lab technicians tried to hit it with a monkey wrench.

The company denies the allegations.

Check out the Alcor website here -- (gulp) interesting stuff.

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17 comments
Amadeus332
Amadeus332

The compay that will freeze dry Larry will complete construction of a walk-n Micowave Oven at the end of this month.....Thaw on low for 8 hours until done....

advancedatheist
advancedatheist

Skeptics can evaluate cryonics in two ways.

A skeptic can say, "Cryonics can't or won't work," given scientific reasons A, B, C, etc. Then he loses interest and goes off to criticize global warming denialists or something.

Or a skeptic could say, "Hmm, cryonics can't or won't work if you do it that way." Then if he thinks like an inventive problem solver and knows some biology, he might evaluate the problem by changing some of its assumptions. For example, he might employ a common creative thinking technique where he imagines the end result - revival of a human brain from cryonic suspension with its connectome intact - then works backwards to see what that implies about its starting conditions. The exercise could suggest new ways to perform suspensions.

Cryonics in its currently underdeveloped & neglected state provides opportunities for the latter sort of skeptics who want to work hard and accomplish great things. College-aged guys with aspirations of becoming the next Steve Jobs, Sergey Brin or other high-tech super-achievers should give cryonics a look.

advancedatheist
advancedatheist

The company came under fire a few years ago when former Alcor executive Larry Johnson wrote a tell-all book about "cryonics," in which he describes how Williams' frozen head was tossed around like a baseball while lab technicians tried to hit it with a monkey wrench.

If you would bother to read Johnson's book, as I have, he writes that he witnessed an Alcor employee in his 60's accidentally strike Ted Williams's head with a wrench.

Of course, in the same book Johnson claims he heard that Arizona businessman & cryonicist David Pizer runs a cult in central Arizona which kidnaps & murders people. Johnson has some serious issues with his credibility.

Max More
Max More

It is not entirely correct to say that Alcor bills itself as "the leader in cryonics (freezing dead bodies)". We are indeed the leader in the field, both in terms of size and level of technology. However, we do not freeze, we vitrify. Freezing results in the formation of ice crystals, which damage cell membranes. We vitrify, which involves no ice crystal formation as we reduce our patients' temperature to minus 196 C. We also do not regard our patients as dead in any final sense. -- Max More, Alcor Foundation president

shadeaux14
shadeaux14

Maybe it's the angle but, in the above picture, Larry's head has a strangely Alien shape. Is he a Scientologist?

PTCGAZ
PTCGAZ

I am not saying it will/won't work now or in the future, but I would much rather be returned to the planet to be reused by something else.Fire and Ice. Take your pick.

PTCGAZ
PTCGAZ

well they sure as shit aren't living...

Max More
Max More

You are correct. They are not living. But not living doesn't mean dead in any final sense. It means non-functioning. If your car "dies", you don't throw it away, you get the malfunctioning parts replaced.

PTCGAZ
PTCGAZ

why the fuck should I feel guilty for existing?

I don't feel a think like that at all.

PTCGAZ
PTCGAZ

ok so if you aren't living you are dead. It's as simple as that. It's really not that complicated.

advancedatheist
advancedatheist

Cryonicists want to turn death from a permanent off-state into a temporary off-state.

Car_del99
Car_del99

Take the ones you have to a mechanic

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