Community Colleges Considering Adding Transgendered to List of Protected Groups

Categories: Higher Learning
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The Maricopa County Community College District board is considering adding transgendered people to its list of groups protected from harassment.

Arizona State University and the University of Arizona have included transgendered people in their anti-discrimination policies for years.

Currently, the community colleges recognize things like race, religion, and sexual orientation in their anti-discrimination policies. People who are transgendered are not included on the list.

By adding transgendered people to its list of protected groups, the community colleges would protect the transgendered from discrimination regardless of whether they're medically transitioning to the other gender.

Family Watch International -- an organization setup to "preserve and promote the family, based on marriage between a man and a woman as the societal unit that provides the best outcome for men, women and children" -- isn't happy about the proposed change.

Sharon Slater, president of the Gilbert-based group, tells the Arizona Republic her organization opposes the move.

From the Republic:  

"This would protect the behavior of anyone, for example, a man who wishes to present himself as a female, which means they could use girls showers and bathrooms," said Sharon Slater, president of the Gilbert-based group. "Proponents of this policy have suggested that they do not think that people who suffer from gender-identity disorder should be confined to the gender-neutral bathrooms created for this purpose.

"What if a male presents as a female to be on a sports team? How do you deal with that?"

She said the protection would be too broad. "There's no limitation. It's not defined as what that expression can or can't be when it steps over the line."

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7 comments
MCC Alumnus
MCC Alumnus

I had the opportunity several years agoto meet Mrs. Slater, and I remember her as a person of genuinedecency, intelligence, and personal integrity. She impressed me assomeone far from being a "hater", or otherwise prone toassume the worst about the motivations of another. I think she issomebody who is bravely willing to take a stand, however unpopular,for issues of morality and civility that she truly believes in.

On a side note, don't you think thereis something ironic about calling somebody names like"hater", or "bigoted, raging, imbecile"? Isthere any particular emotion you've noticed that commonly motivatesname-calling? . . . Now, if you assume being right about the issuejustifies being angry, remember that all angry people feel justifiedin their own anger, and we must admit that their anger per seis not a good indication of (or helpful to) the rightness of theirposition.

Mistalee asks what point Mrs. Slater ismaking in the following:

"Proponents of this policy havesuggested that they do not think that people who suffer fromgender-identity disorder should be confined to the gender-neutralbathrooms created for this purpose."

The point is that adopting this policymeans that since anyone has a right to present themselves as eithergender, everyone has a right to use any restroom they want. Thisincludes, for example, a man presenting himself as a woman and usinga restroom reserved for women. I think it is safe to say that for most women,being in the restroom with him would make them feel veryuncomfortable, and even intimidated or unsafe. Regardless of hisintentions, do these women have no right to feel this way? Wouldtheir feelings not count as much as his? Are the natural andlegitimate concerns of these women overruled by a politically correctimperative? It is hard to believe that common-sense concerns likethis can be dismissed so easily.

Everyone should be treated withrespect, but this includes all people, not just the transgendered. It is often difficult to balance the competing interests of differentpeople in a civil society. It has always and will always depend moreon the goodwill we have for one another, than on the legal policieswe adopt. But we ought to be much more careful than this abouttaking away the reasonable and proper rights of some to protect theinterest of others.

Mistalee
Mistalee

"Proponents of this policy have suggested that they do not think that people who suffer from gender-identity disorder should be confined to the gender-neutral bathrooms created for this purpose."

And? She says this like it makes some sort of a point. She also says this as if most business establishments have gender-neutral bathrooms. And as if such bathrooms were created specifically for the gender-dysphoric.

She is a bigoted ,raging imbecile. Are you sure she isn't Michelle Bachmann, moonlighting?

Walter Concrete
Walter Concrete

So she's against the perversion of civilization.   What's wrong with that?   And why shouldn't everyone be protected from harassment and not just people who choose to mutilate their bodies?    Liberalism/Communism is a Zionist pushed agenda.    I'm sure many of you will now attempt to show me the errors of my ways.

shadeaux14
shadeaux14

Sharon,

Why doncha go up to Colorado City and do some family watchin there?

And take your prejudices with you.

Hock
Hock

"Sharon Slater, president of the Gilbert-based group, tells the Arizona Republic her organization opposes the move."

Hater.

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