Why I Still Love Green Day's Dookie, 20 Years After Its Release

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Reprise Records
Song associations are strange, because when I hear "Longview" by Green Day, I think of Rosemarie Sandoval's hair. We were both sophomores, sharing a table in Mr. Nardinelli's third period art class. I think she was almost a year older, and if she wasn't taller than me anyway, her bangs sure were. Between the towering, lacquered fan rising from her forehead, a wardrobe consisting entirely of Aztec-god-holding-naked-lady-over-a-low-rider t-shirts, and a constant array of hickies, Rosemarie kind of terrified me, especially when I saw her beat the shit out of some girl outside of Spanish the following spring.

Mr. Nard played the radio on a component stereo up behind his desk, and on that day, he switched it to KWOD 106.5 (Sacramento's New Rock Alternative). Rosemarie got super huffy about it. "Naaard!" she complained. "Why can't we just listen to oldies?" It was a commercial break, and when the DJ came back, he mentioned something about "the new one from Green Day." Rosemarie spent the rest of the period sulking and patting her bangs in front of her compact; I busily worked on my upside-down Picasso drawing, until Mike Dirnt's bass intro wandered out of the speakers and into my brain forever.


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EyeHateGod's Jimmy Bower Talks About Staying in the Van

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Bill Ebbesen
Eyehategod
"I think there's a big misconception of EyeHateGod," says Jimmy Bower. "People see the name, think, maybe these guys are Satanists, maybe they're just stupid."

I first heard EyeHateGod back in 1992 when In the Name of Suffering came out. Admittedly, I was as enthused by their name as much as their
 music -- I was always looking for bands whose very name was offensive. But with that record I ended up quite pleased by the music that came out of my super-cool Park 'n Swap speakers. I was immediately a fan.

I caught up with EyeHateGod's Jimmy Bower, lovingly referred to as the Godfather of Southern Metal, on Sunday afternoon. Here's what he had to say.

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The 21 Best Heavy Metal Albums of 2013

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Ghost BC
It's that time of year where our focus is officially shifting from reflecting on 2013 to preparing for 2014. Another 365 days have swept by, full of heavy metal ups and downs, groupies and drug overdoses, mind-blowing riffs and sold-out shows. The state of metal in 2013 certainly hasn't blown my mind--I mean, bad pop music is so pervasive in our culture that it's difficult for any other genre to avoid drowning in the thick, soupy droning known as mainstream music.

However, there was interesting music being made this past year, and lots of heavy metal news and some great interviews. And it was a busy year for Metal Mondays. In tradition end of year "best of" lists, here are a handful of my favorite Metal Mondays that ran in 2013, from interviews with world-renowned metal legends to the insane local metal scene.


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2014 Grammy Nominees: Why Metal Will Make A Strong Showing

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Black Sabbath's return earned a number of 2014 Grammy nominations.
The Grammys has never been known for supporting heavy metal. Heavy bands show up and it's like a burnout kid crashing his parents' fancy dinner party. Even when Halestorm won Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance for their song "Love Bites (And So Do I)" at the 2013 Grammys, Lzzy Hale told me that she felt like the band was the awkward red-headed step child the entire night.

Hell, the metal category isn't even a part of the televised ceremony. Regardless of that, the nominees for the the 2014 Grammy Awards have been announced, and rock and metal have a surprisingly solid presence.

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Top 11 Metal Shows in Phoenix This December

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Howitzer Facebook
Howitzer at this year's UFiesta
It can be easy to miss unless you're looking for it, but there's a lot of metal in the Valley, locals and touring acts alike. Our Metal Mondays columnist, Lauren Wise, is always on the lookout for the best local and national metal shows to come through town.

That's why we had her compile this monthly list of Top 11 metal shows you should hit up this month. We chose 11 for December, because in November we only brought you nine. Merry f**cking Christmas.

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The Shrine: "No One Is Really Running Our Shit for Us"

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K.C. Libman
Jeff Murray, Josh Landau and Court Murphy of The Shrine
Josh Landau can't stop moving -- mostly because he doesn't allow himself to. He's the vocalist for Venice Beach-based The Shrine, along with band members Court Murphy and Jeff Murray, he manages Eliminator, his own skateboarding and clothing company, and the band's about to embark on a series of continent-crossing tours over the next six months. Landau is a busy dude, and The Shrine's squealing feedback and furious riffing is just as unsettled as the Dogtown do-it-yourself era that took place down the street from his childhood home, the sonic manifestation of shotgunned beers and skating as fast as you can through city traffic.

"What we're doing is kind of a neighborhood thing, as far as how we operate on our own terms," Landau says. "No one is really running our shit for us -- we're pretty heavily influenced by a lot of the stuff that went down in Los Angeles, both music and skating. Now there's people all over the world writing in and being interested in it."

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Testament's Alex Skolnick: "The Main Players in Grunge Were All Metal Fans"

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Since 1983, California-bred Testament has evolved into one of the biggest names in thrash metal. If you were a metal fan in the past three decades, chances are such albums as 1987's The Legacy, 1992's The Ritual and 2008's The Formation of Damnation. And of course, the band's most recent album, 2012's Dark Roots of Earth.

Even though the band has gone through multiple line-up changes (guitarist Eric Peterson has been the only constant member) and 20 collective albums, I must say that I still find the band synonymous with the current roster. That includes two of its original members, guitarist Alex Skolnick and bassist Greg Christian, drummer Gene Hoglan, and vocalist Chuck Billy, who replaced singer Steve Souza in 1986 before the first studio album and has been on board ever since.

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Fall Out Boy Is Releasing a Punk Album: Here's Why It's Legit

Categories: Punk & Hardcore

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Punk has always been made to be atypical in both approach and presentation. In 2013, however, few would expect Fall Out Boy, the once-TRL darling pop-punk five-piece, and Ryan Adams, one of the most genre-crossing musicians of our generation, to come together to release a hardcore, punk EP. In this case, the presentation, approach, and the collaboration is anything but expected.

As if made in a completely hasty, indirect response to the vitriol spread by once-loyal fans (myself included), "Love, Sex, Death" is the perfect foil to Save Rock and Roll--it's the actual rock 'n' roll that needs to be saved. Given their radio success with mega-hit "My Songs Know What You Did In The Dark (Light 'Em Up)," Fall Out Boy's upcoming PAX AM Days is the unlikely, belated harbinger of the same message they set out to spread.

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FIDLAR: "We Just Wanted To Play Loud"

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FIDLAR Facebook
Elvis Kuehn, Max Kuehn, Zac Carper, and Brandon Schwartzel of FIDLAR
To musical purists, Los Angeles' FIDLAR isn't all that complicated. To the Urban Outfitters, vinyl-collecting teen set, FIDLAR could be seen as intimidating. To the dirty, denim-clad, skateboarding, chainsmoking neo-angst kids, FIDLAR is a voice. Acronymic for Fuck It Dog, Life's A Risk, the band, in all aspects of their approach, embody the antithesis of stereotyped current Los Angeles music. They're brash, they're loud, and you'll likely leave a show bloody, covered in beer, or both -- they're simply fun as hell.

Of all things, FIDLAR was formed as a viable response to the frustrations of its members: An outlet that differed from the Silver Lake and Echo Park scenes, something in line with the rise of similarly heavy acts like The Shrine and Pangea, and even the major-to-minor label change for bassist Brandon Schwartzel, who came from slicked-back L.A. brethren act Rooney.

"Me and Zac lived in Echo Park and Silver Lake for a long time and were around all those indie bands that were playing, and that was kind of one of the reasons that we started making music that we do," says Schwartzel, speaking by phone after having just stepped out of a Russian spa in Seattle. "We just wanted to play loud, playing with bands that had the same attitude. It's awesome to see everyone doing well."

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Volbeat's Michael Poulsen: The Biggest Mission We Have on Earth Is Finding Love

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Elvis, Johnny Cash, King Diamond, Black Sabbath, Ramones, Fats Domino, Motorhead--these are just a few of the influences that make Danish rock band Volbeat tick. And it seems to work out for them. They've been headlining in Europe for almost a decade, and all of their studio albums have been certified gold. Their second album, Rock the Rebel/Metal the Devil went platinum, and 2010's Beyond Hell/Above Heaven went double platinum in Denmark, platinum in Finland and Germany, and gold in Austria and Sweden.

Within the past few years they've been bringing their rockabilly-meets-classic-rock-meets-heavy-metal to the United States, and over that time they've steadily been gaining popular ground.

Up On the Sun talked with vocalist/guitarist Michael Poulsen about his favorite decade of music, the influence Arizona has on the band's Wild West imagery, and how the band's sound will evolve now that they have a thrash guitarist on board.

Volbeat is playing Desert Uprising with Avenged Sevenfold, HIM and Halestorm at Ak-Chin Pavilion on Friday, September 13.

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