Nils Lofgren on Old School, Clarence Clemons, The E Street Band, and New Hips

Categories: Q&A

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What were you doing at 17? Chances are it wasn't half as rock 'n' roll as Nils Lofgren. At that tender age, he was playing on Neil Young's seminal record, After the Gold Rush, plopped down at a piano, which he had never spent much time playing, but where his experience on the accordion came in handy.

From there he formed Grin and issued a few solo records before joining up with Bruce Springsteen's legendary E Street Band in 1984.

With the E Street band off the road for a bit, recovering both from the Magic and Working on a Dream tours, not to mention the tragic passing of longtime saxophonist Clarence Clemons, Lofgren has turned his attention to spending time at his home in Phoenix, and has just issued a new record, Old School.

Part rumination on growing older and part ass-kicker, the album finds him paired with Lou Gramm of Foreigner, Paul Rodgers of Free, Bad Company, and Queen, and legendary soul man Sam Moore (another Phoenician).

"I've been singing and playing 43 years. What the hell is going on?" Lofgren laughs as we discuss the new record, the passing of Clemons, and his new set of hips.

Up on the Sun: I feel very lucky. I got to see you with the E Street Band in 2009. I am so glad I got to see Clarence. His shadow looms over this record.

Nils Lofgren: Yeah, of course, I stood next to him for 27 years on stage, but we had an even deeper friendship off stage. We used to speak every week, and from the day I walked in to the band, he was always right there as a best friend. Three years ago, I had my hips replaced, and he's been through that. For a lot of reasons he was a very close dear friend. Certainly going to miss him for the rest of my life. But, it's a tragic part of life: as you get older you have to start saying goodbye.

The record seem to have two themes: there's an angry, axe-to-grind theme on songs like "Old School" and "60 is the New 18," and a more melancholy side. "Ain't Too Many of Us Left," which features Sam Moore, seems to be about learning to say goodbye.

Well, it's reflective and passionate. I just turned 60, and it's hard to spin that number, even for a young-at-heart rocker who's been on the road for 43 years. At the moment, I've been out touring, I was just on the east coast with my acoustic trio, and I was at the Rhythm Room twice in the last year. You know, partly you're sitting there playing loud rock n' roll, and it's working and you're feeling good about it, and the other half [of the time] you're like, "Damn, I'm sixty. I've been singing and playing 43 years. What the hell is going on?" [laughs]

You know, you have to deal with it with a sense of humor and levity, but also some reality. Sometimes I have to remind myself -- I walk around and my hips don't hurt. They were killing me for a decade. I got both replaced three years, not that I've forgot. It was a huge experience and I'm not a fan of doctors or hospitals. But just trying to keep your head in the game. You think you're going to live forever as a kid, and mistakenly you still think that when you're in a good moment as you get older. Which is probably healthy, but you've got to temper it with reality.

After the last E Street run, which was so great to do, two albums back-to-back, but I knew it was time for another solo run. I also knew it was time to find a balance between performing live, which is healthy, cause you pay some bills and you hone your craft as a performer, and an experience that you bring home to the studio to make a record. I tried to find a balance between my six dogs, and my lovely wife Amy, and the beautiful home she's made for me, but leaving home to play and just trying to help my family out at home and work on a record in my home studio.

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7 comments
Ccchristmas
Ccchristmas

Capture the essence of the season. One of the beauties of recorded music is its eternal power to play on long after the artist is physically gone. Clarence has a parting Christmas gift to us all with these soon to be holiday classics. Open up your hearts and listen to the Big Man say Merry Christmas to the world. order today - will not be sold in stores - www.bigmanchristmassong.com

Tara Camp
Tara Camp

This is really, really cool. It's so nice to see the spirit of Clarence living on. His oldest son is actually doing a record release show for some Clarence Clemons Christmas songs that were discovered. Not sure if they are available, but you can check the "Nick Clemons Band" page on Facebook.

Ccchristmas
Ccchristmas

Capture the essence of the season. One of the beauties of recorded music is its eternal power to play on long after the artist is physically gone. Clarence has a parting Christmas gift to us all with these soon to be holiday classics. Open up your hearts and listen to the Big Man say Merry Christmas to the world. order today - will not be sold in stores - www.bigmanchristmassong.com

pyewacket
pyewacket

nils is one of my favorite performers...so talented, with such a unique voice...and i think i love him even more knowing that he has admired the great paul rodgers since his days with 'free',  but is anyone besides me bothered by the fact that the writer of this great article has misspelled the name of the great paul rodgers? 

Jason P. Woodbury
Jason P. Woodbury

Thanks for the politest pointing out of a spelling error I've received. I appreciate the spot, and it's fixed now. Lofgren was a pleasure to speak to, and I'm proud we can count him as an Arizonan. 

PsycheDellyBelly
PsycheDellyBelly

Wow, great piece on a great guy. Nils, you rock brother. Long may you run !

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