Inside The Drip Room: Scottsdale's First Foray into the Multi-Layered World of IV Vitamins

driproomdeerhead_jhilliard.jpg
Janessa Hilliard
Hip & healthy-conscious: a non-traditional IV hanger at The Drip Room, a new intravenous vitamin clinic in Scottsdale.

Her lips are pursed tightly together in premonition. She looks to her right, away from her left arm outstretched on the plush, white lounge chair. She squints slightly, smiles briefly, and refuses to watch as a tiny needle is injected into her vein just below the inner crease of her elbow. It's over in mere moments, akin to the prick that comes with a blood draw or an intravenous drip. It is an intravenous drip, in fact, but this isn't a hospital or even a traditional doctor's office, and certainly not a blood bank.

"Now I'll read my book," the woman says, gesturing to the iPad across her lap. "They have iPads here, too. Or sometimes I'll watch TV."

She looks up at Dr. Brent Cameron, a curly-haired naturopathic physician, who is monitoring her from across the room.

"I can already taste it in the back of my mouth," she says.

See also: Shine: Your Pocket Guide to Scottsdale

Leslie Zelisko is getting an intravenous vitamin treatment. The 50-year-old, who looks fresh-faced and boasts about her "good veins," has been receiving these therapies at The Drip Room since the business opened its doors last November. Though her face may have betrayed some initial apprehension at the prospect of being poked with a needle, Zelisko, who is married to Valley concert promoter Danny Zelisko, says she routinely drops by to get the clinic's energy, immunity, and detox treatments -- anywhere from once a week to once every 10 or 14 days.

Marketed as the Valley's first IV vitamin hub, The Drip Room, located at 4251 North Brown Avenue, is hidden within the folds of Old Town Scottsdale -- directly around the corner from Firehouse, an anchor in the club scene where, on even the most average of Friday or Saturday nights, it's far from surprising to see women in heels stumbling on sidewalks and men in button-ups clinging to bottles of beer. Look down the street in either direction to see bars like Shotgun Betty's hiding in plain sight among unassuming businesses.

The interior beyond The Drip Room's camouflaged façade looks like any number of day spas in the area. Six large massage chairs line the walls -- one mirrored, one taken up by a large television screen, two adorned with white faux moose and deer heads. Four colorful oxygen bar tanks occupy a crisp white table in front of the big screen, which today splays highlights from sporting events and celebrity exploits.

But the experience is inherently a social one, explains Shirley Kelly, a registered nurse who founded and co-owns The Drip Room. Kelly, whose background is in the field of cosmetic surgery, likens the atmosphere to that of a salon and refers to her clients -- she prefers the term "client" over "patient" -- as "early adopters, ahead of the curve."

Kelly opened the business in late 2013 with the help of Dr. Cameron, a naturopathic physician who also operates a private practice in Gilbert, and her husband, Ross Cobb.

The venture is licensed under Cameron, and all potential recipients of the treatment must provide their medical history and undergo blood work and a physical exam before their first dose. Despite the comfortable vibe, it becomes immediately and abundantly clear: This is a treatment program based in an alternative form of medicine. This is not a business attempting to profit off of an alleged trend.


Location Info

Map

The Drip Room

4251 North Brown Avenue, Scottsdale, AZ

Category: General

Old Town Scottsdale

7375 E. Stetson Drive, Scottsdale, AZ

Category: General

Firehouse - CLOSED

4312 N. Brown Ave., Scottsdale, AZ

Category: Music

Shotgun Betty's Rock & Roll Saloon

7330 E. Stetson Drive, Scottsdale, AZ

Category: Music

D'Lish Kitchen and Coffee House

2613 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale, AZ

Category: Restaurant


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23 comments
gtlitup
gtlitup

where did the deer head come from?

gtlitup
gtlitup

where did the deer head come from?


Larry Gulliford
Larry Gulliford

People with money will buy anything, I swear. Ask your doctor what he thinks about this?

Scott Kerr
Scott Kerr

your very sad if you do this. . . . just sad

Pon Farr
Pon Farr

Cuckoo cuckoo. The future is arrived and it is weird. Some Hunter S Thompson is in order here.

Javier Danger J
Javier Danger J

Scottsdale people will do anything stupid without a second thought. Figures

Alan King
Alan King

Do NOT take anything via IV drip outside of a hospital or without a medical practitioner's advice. 1) Not likely to be of any medicinal value. 2) IV ruptures the skin, so without adequate antiseptic technique, there is a definite opportunity for infection. 3) Vitamins should be consumed from food. If you're eating a healthy diet, you get all the vitamins you need. Only folks who can't absorb or obtain the vitamins they need despite diet should worry about IM or IV vitamins. 4) Just because some Hollywood douchebag does it, doesn't mean it's healthy. // In case anyone asks, source: I work in pharmacy

Karen Vucurevich
Karen Vucurevich

Interesting concept...when it comes to iv therapy and vitamins there should be tighter regulation for effectiveness, studies and research. Any pharmaceutical has to go through the r and d process. Lets hope they are not billing insurance companies without proper testing.

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