10 Reasons Hiring Restaurant Staff Is Harder Than Ever

Categories: Bites & Dishes

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Brenda Gottsabend, Flickr
Staffing a restaurant (and keeping it staffed) is one of the most difficult and time-consuming tasks owners and chefs face. And turnover? The industry's nearly famous for it.

Although the hiring of both back- and front-of-the-house positions has always been a challenge, is hiring restaurant staff today harder than it's ever been?

Many Valley chefs and restaurateurs say yes. Here are 10 reasons.

See also: 10 Kinds of Restaurants Chefs Wish Existed in the Valley

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Chef Dennis Delamater,
The Post (Opening in February)

For a chef trying to find good cooks, it's very hard. More and more applicants with culinary school under their belt demand higher pay without quality, old-fashioned experience -- which is the most valuable base to have.

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Chef Admir Alibasic,
Ben & Jack's Steakhouse, Scottsdale

It's easier hiring people because of the way the economy is working at this time, but it's harder hiring people with quality experience.

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Michael Brown
Chef and Owner, Jamburritos Cajun Grille Express

Commitment to a job or career is not as it used to be. Employees are exercising their rights to move from job to job or, in some cases, no job. Most of the résumés I get show the average length of time candidates spend at one job at six months or less.



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3 comments
klresquiva
klresquiva

I concur.  I have been in this industry for over 25 years.  The pay in kitchens is apallingly low here, yet chefs and owners want employee loyalty.  You get what you pay for, people.  Just that simple. 

Michael Brownlee
Michael Brownlee

Agreed. The irony in all their statements is that employee and employer chemistry is a 2 way street. They have all these expectations of their employees (which is fine) but then they want them to work their ass off for minimum wage or worse. A year later.....very little has changed but then they wonder why people leave. Not to disrespect these chefs, but they want a world where staff are plentiful, eager and willing to work for for nothing. But then they want experience and don't want to pay for this experience. I'd like to get into restaurants again, I have a passion for it.....but the hours and the pay sucks.....I'd gut it out but there's Typically ZERO upside. Hope for a 1$ hour raise in a year? Might make $10/hr in 3 years? No thanks. I don't make much, but if I were to be hired at what I make now, I'd bust so much ass and soak as much knowledge up as I possibly could. I'd be a machine, in early-out late, covering shifts, etc. And trust me, I make way less than I did 1 year ago.

whateveryousay
whateveryousay topcommenter

When many of these positions are being offered at $4.30 per hour for a server and $7.80 for others it's no surprise there isn't any loyalty by job applicants or employees.

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