Eatmecrunchy Bowl Keeps Cereal and Milk Separate For Optimal Crunchy

Categories: Wake Up Call

cut-away-model Eatmecrunchy-001.jpg
Courtesy: Eatmecrunchy.com
A cutaway revealing the inner workings of a Eatmecrunchy cereal bowl.

Humanity might not have the technology or motivation to stop 10 ton meteorites from pelting our planet but by damn have we finally licked the problem of soggy cereal. The Eatmecrunchy bowl is an ingenious device that keeps milk and cereal separated into two distinct sections except for a spoon size trough which we refer to as the "reaction chamber."

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According to their webpage the milk loads into the bottom of the bowl and it kept from uncontrolled mixing with the cereal by means of a removable shelf. The cereal sits on the shelf formed by the milk containment unit and can be pushed into the reaction chamber where it can mix for as little or as much time as you desire. The shelf covers 70% of the bottom of the bowl and reserves 30% of the total area for the reaction chamber.

It is not as elegant a solution as proposed in Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon but in all fairness that fictional character was dealing with a very specific posed by a specific cereal: Cap'n Crunch. That said a specially designed spoon with a milk channel that could be activated to precisely mix cereal and milk on-spoon would still be the methodology with the best control. We can further imagine a wifi enabled smart system like the hapifork that would let you precisely calibrate optimal milk to cereal ratio for each scoop of a particular kind of cereal.

Or maybe people can just eat their cereal faster, that's an idea too. If not you can buy one off their webpage for around $23.

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1 comments
JohnQ.Public
JohnQ.Public

Clever.  But wouldn't it be great if bright, creative, clever people used those immense skills to solve problems that were really, well, problems?

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