Should Restaurants Host Political Functions?

Categories: Bites & Dishes

Welcome to Chow Bella's Bites & Dishes, where Valley chefs and restaurateurs respond to a question New Times food critic Laura Hahnefeld has on her mind. Have a question you'd like to ask? E-mail laura.hahnefeld@newtimes.com. Miss a question? Go here.

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Dave Andrea,
Owner of Brat Haus

Political functions, corporate functions, private parties. What's the difference? Most restaurants need all the business they can get and are happy to host anyone that's willing to pay for the services. If the restaurant is willing to donate a portion of the meal or drinks, it's the same as discounting for Groupon or any other promotion that brings people into the restaurant with the hopes of bringing them back at full price.

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Joe Johnston, Owner, Joe's Real BBQ, Joe's Fresh Farm Grill, Liberty Market, Agritopia

It's certainly their choice to sell food to whatever individuals or groups may wish to partake since they are in the food making and serving business. The risk is being associated with a particular group or political stance, which may not be in a restaurant's best interest. We recently allowed a function on property and are not planning on doing it again due to this issue.

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Chef Stephen Jones,
Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails

If a restaurant wants to host a political event, it's their business or prerogative to do so. From an event perspective, a restaurant is a business with bills and sales goals that need to be met.




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Kirsten Burruel, General Manager
DownUnder Wines and Bistro

I have no desire to mix pleasure and politics. By hosting a political event, you have labeled your establishment with a particular perspective, even if it is not yours. Dining and social experiences are for relaxation and fun. We all need somewhere to go to escape and enjoy fine food and company without influence.


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Josh Hebert
Owner and Chef, Posh

It's up to the individual, but with the polarization of the current political climate, I don't know that it would be high on my list. Everything in the end has a price.



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3 comments
jaclyn8946
jaclyn8946

Welcome to Chow Bella's Bites & Dishes, where Valley chefs and restaurateurs respond to a question New Times food critic Laura Hahnefeld has on her mind. Have a question you'd like to ask?

 

http://www.handdryersandmore.com/

danzigsdaddy
danzigsdaddy topcommenter

it shouldnt matter. i go to a restaurant for their food. if they can draw in a organized party like that, good for them. just because a restaurant allows a political group to use their services or location does not mean that those are their beliefs or opinions, it means they allow their patrons to have their own beliefs or opinions and to excersize them. now if a restaurant refused someone service because of their political affiliation......well thats their right, but i wouldnt agree with it. many political parties or functions are catering to people with money, so allowing those functions is good buisness sense

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