New Food Truck: White Eyes Fresh Fry Bread

white eyes.jpg
White Eyes
White Eyes Fresh Fry Bread owners Alice and John

Editor's Note: We have corrected Phoenix Food Truck Coalition to Phoenix Street Food Coalition.

The business: White Eyes Fresh Fry Bread, not your average Indian fry bread, brought to you by Alice Roach and her husband, John.

What you need to know: For the past six years, the Roaches have been serving their fry bread at special events, concerts, and fundraisers, but with the explosion of mobile eateries, they've decided to take their show on the road. So what's so special about White Eyes? They've created what's reportedly the only frozen-dough fry bread in the country.

The story: Alice learned to make fry bread (the good old fashioned way) when she was living near Fort Defiance on the Navajo Nation. She continued to make her fry bread by hand for years, and when her friends and family couldn't get enough, Alice eventually realized the labor-intensive process would never let her keep up with mounting demand. With the help of a chef who specializes in making frozen pizza dough, Alice created a way to make fry bread dough that could be frozen, stored, and shipped, and then prepared in less than a minute.

White Eyes Fry Bread
White Eyes
White Eyes Fresh Fry Bread
"It's obvious to us it's a very widely needed product on many levels," says John. "We've found this product has its niche."

In addition to serving her fry bread at special events, Alice sells her product online, allowing fry-bread fiends to cook up their own bread at home.

Where the name came from: With neither Alice nor John having Native American blood, they wanted to stay away from any Native American connotation. "We didn't want to infringe on any of that," says John. Thinking back to old country movies where cowboy snipers were called the "white eyes," John settled on the name and adopted a depiction of a "camp cook" as their logo. Thus, White Eyes was born.

The driving vision: Although White Eyes says they'll stay north (in central Arizona, Prescott, and Flagstaff) during the upcoming months, the pair hopes to make appearances at 25 to 30 special events a year. In the future, Alice envisions seeing her frozen fry bread at retail stores and says White Eyes already has their sights set on a brick-and-mortar location. As new members of the Phoenix Street Food Coalition, they hope to have their trailer on the streets daily for lunch sometime soon.

"We really want to see how far we can go with this," says Alice.

Check out the White Eyes website for future updates.

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Location Info

Map

White Eyes Fresh Fry Bread

, Phoenix, AZ

Category: Restaurant


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29 comments
Birdiesfrybread
Birdiesfrybread

We at Birdies Fry Bread Love this Story and wish White Eyes Fry Bread the best of Luck..

Guest
Guest

Though these people claim to be staying away from Native American "connotations", the history of this particular food item is often overlooked and should be recognized as it is a staple food that was once a symbol of poverty for indigenous peoples in Arizona. I'd like to see more discussion about this and cultural appropriation in terms of food. I also find it interesting that this food truck will be rivaling Emerson Fry Bread which is actually owned by a Native American family. 

Maxine Weakland
Maxine Weakland

The fry bread is fresh and I enjoy seeing them at different events around the state.  Good people, best of luck.

Confoodcious
Confoodcious

Low hanging fruit? Hardly. If it was low hanging fruit, then why did Payton Curry partner up with other food trucks in South Scottsdale? Is Chef Curry low hanging fruit now too?

Also, I believe it's the "Phoenix Street Food Coalition" and not Food Truck Coalition.

FeelingRunDown
FeelingRunDown

food truck stories are stories that ran out of gas

Food Trucks
Food Trucks

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Ando Muneno
Ando Muneno

Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks
Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks Food Trucks

There you go Food Trucks, saved you the trouble. 

Still waiting on those suggestions for other businesses deserving of wider recognition.

Guest
Guest

White Eyes Fry bread is the best. They are worth seeking out. I also like the fact that it is frozen and only takees a minute to cook and someone is not actually using their hands to spread it. Unsanitary.

RoxBox
RoxBox

Frozen is not fresh! Frozen is frozen.

Joel LaTondress
Joel LaTondress

covering food trucks is low-hanging fruit, IMO - i'm not speaking to the quality of their food.  i've had good food from several trucks around town. 

Reader Guy
Reader Guy

IT'S NOW PHOENIX STREET FOOD COALITION!?  FUCK!!

Food Trucks
Food Trucks

I'm not the fucking food writer.  YOU'RE supposed to figure it out.  That's what all of you New Times writers do -- "Oh, I keep writing the same shit?  Please, you tell me what to write about!  Come on, I need ideas.."

Joel LaTondress
Joel LaTondress

isn't that what you guys are getting paid for? food trucks are low-hanging fruit. just because you have a truck and start showing up to events doesn't make it worth spending money on.

Good Food
Good Food

Takes the "gourmet" out of gourmet specialty food trucks. Just like Mcdonalds, plop it on the grill or fryer and onto a paper plate.

Confoodcious
Confoodcious

Ah! That makes sense.

Maybe we (the community) should do a better job of telling the folks at Chow Bella which places to check out so they have something to write about instead of giving all of the attention to the regular "media darlings."

I have to admit, I see more attention being given to the food trucks than some of the other Mom and Pop places around the Valley and it does get a little tiresome.

Ando Muneno
Ando Muneno

Well the restaurant crystal ball is in the shop for repairs so we gotta make do with what we've got. 

Oh and by the way, after our last conversation I did a bit of reconnaissance and scoped out a brand new Chinese place in Chandler that I might write about (it's great for a local joint, but not necessarily special in the aggregate).

I'm also finishing up two more stories on food trucks! They serve good food, I'm not sure what else I'm supposed to be doing here besides pointing people to places where they can exchange money for food that doesn't suck.

Ando Muneno
Ando Muneno

It's not exactly low-hanging fruit, we have to drive out and hunt these people down like any other business. Sometimes it's actually more trouble because they keep odd hours and typically (especially when they start out) don't have a regular schedule. Plus you're right, there's no guarantee they'll be any good. 

Personally, on a convenience/gas money level, I would rather check out a physical restaurant or an event than a food truck. I know when they're going to be there, I have a general idea of how busy they are (so I know when would be a good time to approach them for an interview), etc. It's a lot less of a gamble. 

Now that said, Phoenix is a sprawl in the truest sense of the word. I live in Chandler, the stories I've covered reflect the fact that as a freelancer I can't afford to drop $20 bucks in gas to scope out a new opening in Glendale unless I know it's going to make for a halfway decent story. It's also the area I'm familiar with because I drive through it on a regular basis. Also, for whatever reason, it's home to a massive and food friendly Asian population that's given rise to gems like Chou's Kitchen, Chodang, and so forth. 

Now another interesting perspective. Recently I started working here at the New Times as their editorial assistant. One of my main duties is to check the tip line/email and screen for possible story leads. Everyday I get at least 3-5 tips regarding regular news stuff, police brutality, discrimination, corruption, whatever. Most of what people leave us never turns into a story but it often points us in the direction of interesting venues of investigation. But as far as food tips go, I think I get maybe 1 or 2 a month, tops. Which always depresses me because I KNOW there are new restaurants opening throughout the Valley, little mom and pop places that fly under the radar. Unlike <insert and="" companies="" food="" here="" major="" restaurants=""> they're so busy just trying to get their business off the ground that they can't send me a press release or leave a message on our tip line. But I'll never know about them, or the quality of their food unless I physically drive by the place or somebody tells me. Just like we would never know about a police brutality case unless we drove by it in progress or somebody told us. 

And that's the key. I have no idea where you live but there's a fair chance it's not Chandler.  You, hopefully, you know your neighborhood better than I ever will. If some quirky Eskimo restaurant opens up down the street from you, you'll know before we know. You'll likely eat there before we've even heard of it. You'll have formed some strong opinions about their reindeer eyes around the time it pops up on our radar. But if you shoot us a message saying "Hey guys, the reindeer eyeballs at this place are fantastic" that speeds up the process of us getting out there to check it out considerably. Now I know that's not your problem, you're just here to read a couple posts that interest you and then get back to whatever you're doing. But food reporting is like any other kind of reporting, we rely upon people telling us what's going on to help guide us through the process of developing stories. We don't have a news crystal ball on our desk that magically lets us know that something cool is going on. I don't expect people to do our jobs (ferreting out and evaluating food) but I don't see the harm in reaching out to the community and saying "Hey guys, what's shaking in your neck of the woods?" Particularly if the community feels like we're missing a bigger better story elsewhere. Or maybe some of you are just tired of hearing about food trucks, which is also fair. But just because you're tired of hearing about food trucks doesn't mean that we're missing something else or that everyone is tired of hearing about them. There are six blog stories loaded into our top stories bar. Only one of them is about food trucks. A couple stories a week about a popular topic isn't exactly full court press. </insert>

good food
good food

A lot of the food trucks in the coalition are mom n pops businesses.

Ando Muneno
Ando Muneno

It would be appreciated. We've got email and a tip line. 

Food Trucks
Food Trucks

I'm angry today.

But no more stories on food trucks, please.

Bored Food Reader
Bored Food Reader

Sounds like a rough life.  No wonder the food writing sucks..

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