Food Truck Frenzy: SuperFarm SuperTruck

Ando Muneno
Casey Stechnij inside the biggest damn food truck in the Valley.

The Business: SuperFarm SuperTruck

What you need to know: If you like Udder Delights you'll be pleasantly surprised to know that Superstition Farm is branching out with a new food truck. Their goal is to take as many of their own products and create hearty staple foods, from burgers to breakfast. As an example they use their buttermilk, a byproduct of milk production, to create their plate spanning pancakes.

The Story: It all started with butter. Due to local demands the farm opened up a small store on their property to sell dairy products like butter and cheese. Shortly after opening their butter supplier simply quit sending them butter and left them in the lurch. Third generation dairy farmer Casey Stechnij, who now runs the food truck, asked the question that started it all, "How hard is it to make butter?" Even though he had no formal food training he dove into the process of making butter and quickly figured out a forumla that worked. No sooner had he finished then their cheese person stopped making deliveries. And so it went, from butter to cheese, and finally to ice cream --which Casey says was the hardest to master-- until Superstition Farm accidentally created their own side business. Or as Casey puts it, "[We] really wanted someone else to do it but we ended up doing it."

What million dollar hurdle torpedoed the SuperFarm SuperRestaurant in favor of the SuperFarm SuperTruck?

SuperFarm Burger
The Farm Burger.
Earlier this year Superstition Farm's operations manager, fashion designer turned dairy farmer by way of marrying the farmer's daughter, Jason Kittenden suggested they open a restaurant. Jason and Casey ran with the idea, straight into a bureaucratic brick wall. After months of talking with state and local regulatory agencies the eventually learned that building even the most basic restaurant on their spacious property would require the pay for a million dollar sewer line to be run through their property.

 

Clearly, it was time for Plan B. Casey, who had just opened Udder Delights a few years earlier, reached out to his Valley food industry contacts and worked out what he needed to run a food trucks successfully. An enormous Mother's Cookies truck was purchased and quickly retrofitted with a full kitchen. That's unusual among the Valley's current fleet of food trucks. Typical food trucks only have a deep fryer and grill but the SuperTruck has room for all of that plus an open range and an oven. This gives them flexibility to cook a wider range of foods on their truck rather than prepping their food in commercial kitchens beforehand.

Where the name came from: Casey they chose the name for the same reason they named their ice cream shop Udder Delights: Because it's "punny."

What is their driving vision? "Farm to fork. It's cliche but we're dedicated to it," said Jason. Their overall hope to focus on creating foods that highlight the fresh ingredients from their farm as well as incorporate fresh ingredients from other local growers. They said they take pride in making a local product from local materials.

Favorite part of your truck? "The leftovers," Casey says with a smile.

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