Low and Slow with Posole Soul: Dinner and A Movie

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Michelle Martinez
Chunks of Pork, Hominy, and Pinto Beans make this a hearty soup.

Staying in? We've got you covered -- both on the culinary and entertainment fronts. Now presenting Dinner and a Movie -- a guide to do a do it yourself evening of food and film.

Now that the hustle of the holidays is over, it is a good time of year to enjoy being at home and perhaps this means spending more time with family. La Familia is the foundation from which we move forward in the world, especially when things get tough. This week's pick pairs some Mexican Soul Food and a Film With Soul.



Film: La Mission (2009)

Popcorn Alternative: Popcorn with Chamoy

Entrée: Posole and warm buttered tortillas

Beverage: Your favorite Mexican beer with a saladito (dried salted prune) on the side.


Get the rundown on the movie and the recipes after the jump.



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Film 

La Mission (2009)

Writer/Director Peter Bratt creates a love letter to lowriders and soul music in this film. Benjamin Bratt plays a man dealing with his son's journey into manhood and must choose between losing his son or facing his own prejudices. La Mission (2009) features South Phoenix raised actor, Jeremy Ray Valdez as the son.The Bratt brothers embrace their love for their hometown of San Francisco and their latinidad in this film.

Make it a double feature: Blood In, Blood Out (1993) Directed by Taylor Hackford. Starring Benjamin Bratt and Jesse Borrego.



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Recipes:

Popcorn with Chamoy

For the popcorn, pop your favorite brand and sprinkle some Chamoy on top. Chamoy is a tangy sauce used to give fruits, vegetables, shaved ice, popcorn, or other foods some chile zip without being spicy. Available at Food City.

Posole

Many families have their own way of making Posole and most do not have written and measured recipes. It is mostly a feeling and a preference of taste. Some families frown on canned beans and canned hominy, however, if you want a simple and homey soup for the soul, the can is the way to go. Here's how I do it:

1 l b . pork roast
1 clove minced garlic
1 tsp each for rub and then more of each to taste for soup:
ground oregano
ground cumin
chile powder
salt pepper
1 medium onion
2-3 cloves garlic
1 can pinto beans, drained
1 can hominy, drained
2 - 3 dried red chile pods (I use the dark red mild/sweet)
2 cans chicken broth
1 bay leaf

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Each family member has their personal way of topping their soup. For garnish set out bowls with the following toppings:

sliced limes
salsa /hot sauce
sliced avocado
chopped cilantro
minced onions (green or white)
jalapeños
whatever else you like

Preparation:

Combine garlic and spices, add a drizzle of olive oil and rub on meat. Set aside in large bowl.

Place chile pods in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil (note: the liquid will turn dark red /brown). Once the chiles are soft, strain and discard chiles. Reserve liquid for the soup.
In stock pot, heat the oil, then brown the pork and add onions (note: if you are using pre-cooked or leftover meat, add once the onions are soft ). Add the chicken broth, garlic ,and More spices . Let simmer for 15 minutes and then add chile liquid in small amounts to taste .

Drain cans of beans and hominy  and add to soup. Let simmer for 30 minutes then ladle into bowls. The longer you let it simmer, the better. Garnish with the cilantro, onion, limes, etc. Posole (like any soup) is always deeper in flavor the next day so save some for breakfast. Serve with a warm buttered tortilla.




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2 comments
Davydiaperboy
Davydiaperboy

damn girl i want some of that pasole. I miss your cooking for me.

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