Closed for Business: Verde

Categories: Laudig

closedforbusiness250.jpg
​Verde
turned out to be the little Mexican restaurant that couldn't.

Couldn't make it for more than seven months, that is.

Sadly, Joseph Aguayo and Matt Avila's affordable Downtown eatery, where handmade tortillas were the focus, closed Sunday. Word on the streets is that they weren't getting enough evening and weekend business to keep the lights on.

Verde's closure was the talk of the Twitterverse this weekend, where locals were lamenting its demise while also holding it up as proof that cool things can't survive in Downtown.

I completely disagree.

Consider Matt Pool's bangin' restaurant right up the block (Matt's Big Breakfast) and the nearby enclave of Sens, PastaBar, and The Turf. ASU is in session, and these other eateries are doing A-okay, as well they should. In my book, it's not a neighborhood problem.

Honestly, I think Verde didn't market itself enough -- or really, at all. They only Tweeted a few times last month, and pretty much abandoned their Facebook efforts for the last couple months. But if they were struggling, they should've put themselves into social media overdrive.

I've also never seen or heard them advertise anywhere. In a city filled with Mexican restaurants, how does one stand out?

The Downtown Phoenix Market takes place twice a week just a stone's throw from Verde -- they could've had a presence there, too, if only to sell those homemade tortillas.

I'll definitely miss Verde (this news has had me craving their pork chile verde), but I can't imagine that space will sit vacant for long. We'll see . . .


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17 comments
Fubar
Fubar

What a tough bidness.

Bill
Bill

Verde seemed like it was doing a great lunch business, and it was even busy on Saturdays when I was in there. Ironically, a lot of the Capitol crowd that used to hang out at El Portal had started eating lunch at Verde, it semed like it was going to be another stomping grounds for the politicos. Now where will they cut their deals?

Madison Avenue
Madison Avenue

I don't get a lot of these local businesses. Why don't they advertise their restaurants? How is anyone going to know what they are doing?? Do they only want people "in the know" to be their customers? Dorks.

Nike, Coke, McDonalds, Apple and Microsoft are pretty good indicators that advertising works. Doesn't matter your budget. SOMETHING is better than nothing.

SundevilRick
SundevilRick

Using Social Media is not effective for bringing new customers in. It is successful in getting people to come back and visit. Verde needed to do a lot more than a few twitter postings.

Shannonclouis
Shannonclouis

Can't judge what a business "should" or "shouldn't" be doing...we have no idea what their personal situations were or if they could afford to absorb the huge cost of professional marketing. Most of the businesses that you see with a huge social media presence gain that by using professional social media companies and professional pr people....

A1413
A1413

Downtown Phoenix is where restaurants go to die

joe.distort
joe.distort

crappy news...never even thought about the fact that they were right by the market. DEFINITELY should have had some presence there.

Nick Bastian
Nick Bastian

I was bummed to hear about Verde closing. Good food, for sure...

Dennis
Dennis

Pizzeria Bianco has never advertised.

But yes I understand what you are saying.

Girl
Girl

This is not true even slightly. Twitter/FB/Blogging/Emails etc are very effective ways to drive new traffic when combined with PR and advertising. It's part of a multi-faceted campaign. I however, have tried MANY new restaurants, including Verde (FYI) because of twitter. I know many others who have as well.

GreenChileLover
GreenChileLover

"Can't judge what a business "should" or "shouldn't" be doing"... I couldn't agree more, is this becoming a gossip column?

Bob
Bob

Shannonclouis -- I'm sorry, but what you're saying about social media just isn't true. I know many, many small and local businesses who have hundreds and even thousands of followers on Facebook and Twitter and they make their updates themselves and their social media initiatives are quite successful. That's the beauty of Social Media for businesses. It's cheap, it's easy and only requires a few basic rules of engagement for success. The professional PR firms who claim businesses need their help are full of a lot of fluff. The main advantage to using them is that they can provide you with detailed reporting on your efforts. Useful stuff for fine-tuning your efforts, but not really necessary for small businesses. In the end, it's about relationship building online and in the real world -- which, unfortunately, Verde wasn't very good at.

Bob
Bob

Sorry, correction: around 60% of restaurants fail in the first 3 years after opening.

Bob
Bob

Wow, what a silly statement, A1413. The restaurant business is tough no matter where you are located. Something like 1 out of 3 fail. That's about the ratio that's played out over the last five years downtown. The writer of this article is correct: While they had a great concept, they knew nothing about how to market themselves. She's also correct that the space won't be vacant for long. Folks are already scrambling for the property.

Shannonclouis
Shannonclouis

True sometimes, but MANY small businesses who have thousands of followers got help from social media experts or pr people. It isn't always obvious when a company has pr behind it. If the pr is good, you really can't tell a biz has that engine behind it. All I'm saying is that running a business is HARD, and we have no idea what went on behind the scenes...

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