Phoenix Cop Daryl Raetz Killed by Hit-and-Run SUV-Driving Scum (w/Update)

OFFICER INVOLVED FATAL HIT AND RUN COLLISION

Date and Time: 05-19-13, approximately 0336 hours
Location: 51st Avenue and Cambridge

Report Number: 2013-00883229

Officer Involved: Daryl Raetz #8899
29-year-old male
Six years with the Phoenix Police Department

Driver of Vehicle: Unknown

Vehicle: Large SUV
Possibly a dark gray or green, Ford Expedition or Lincoln Navigator with primer on the rear area, tinted rear window,
Oversized chrome wheels, fog lights

Shortly after 3:30 a.m. on May 19, 2013, Officer Daryl Raetz, #8899 and his partner were finishing the processing of the scene from a DUI stop in the area of 51st Avenue and Cambridge. At that time, Officer Raetz was struck by another vehicle, which was traveling northbound on 51st Avenue. Officer Raetz was transported to a local hospital, where he died of his injuries.

Officer Raetz was 29-years-old and had been with the department for approximately six years. He was assigned to the 81K squad in the Maryvale Precinct. He was also a military veteran. Officer Raetz leaves behind a wife and young child.

Detectives are still searching for the suspect and suspect vehicle, which fled the scene. The vehicle is described as a dark colored large SUV. It is possibly a dark gray or green 2004 to 2007 Ford Expedition or Lincoln Navigator. Their may be some primer to the rear area of the vehicle. The rear window is believed to be tinted. In addition, the vehicle has oversized chrome rims and fog lights.

Anyone who may have information concerning who or where the suspect is, or where the vehicle may be is asked to contact the Phoenix Police Department at 602- 262-6151 or Silent Witness at 480-WITNESS, 480-TESTIGO for Spanish.

This was a tragic day for the Public Safety Team, which serves the city of Phoenix. In less than 12 hours, Phoenix Firefighter Bradley Harper, a 23-year-old husband and two year member of the Phoenix Fire Department and Officer Raetz both died in the line of duty. Firefighter Harper died as the result of a tragic accident at the scene of a fire. Both men lost their lives doing what they loved, serving our community. The entire community mourns their loss with the Public Safety Family.


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17 comments
MaskedMagician1967
MaskedMagician1967

RIP Officer Raetz. Thank you for your service to our community and our country.

ger52749
ger52749

everday it changes. First the cop are the bad guys, then the good guys. NESWFLASH, there are no good guys. Cops are just as bad.  The scarriest thing of all , is these people can arrest you and claimn whatever they want. DON'T TRUST THE COPS, THEY ARE JUST AS EVIL

yourproductsucks
yourproductsucks

It's a sad day for the Phoenix Public Safety family.  God bless the Raetz and Harper families.

JohnQ.Public
JohnQ.Public

It's tough, isn't it, Stephen to figure out the good guys from the bad guys. Just last month a cop who feared for his life when he shot a driver in a stolen SUV was the SOB in your opinion. http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/2013-04-18/news/a-teen-s-shooting-death-was-avoidable-even-if-the-cops-call-it-justified/. But now that it's the cop that was killed, the SUV driver is the SOB. I guess that if the cop in April had waited to be run over instead of shooting, that teen would have been the SOB and the dead cop would have been the god guy. But instead that cop mad the split second decision as the teen revved the SUV and you've dclared that cop to be the SOB. I wish it was always as to decide who are the good guys and who are the bad guys as you've made it seem.

stephen.lemons
stephen.lemons moderator writer

@Stillwaiting I don't need to "spin it." 

Jodi Arias is a natural-born U.S. citizen.

Therefore all U.S. citizens are killers and belong on death row?

You are a child. Grow up.

stephen.lemons
stephen.lemons moderator writer

@JohnQ.Public Police work is only easy in a police state. As long as we do not live in a police state, an officer's use of force is subject to question by the public. Personally, I think there's a difference between a hit and run on one hand, and a cop tailing a vehicle, and then when it stops, stepping in front of it with an AR-15 instead of waiting for backup.

I think both losses of life are regrettable. A 29 year old man is taken from his family, and a 16 year old never gets to grow up.


mandymountain
mandymountain

@JohnQ.Public So, cops are people, eh? Some are great people, and others are horrible excuses for humanity. Sometimes they're the good guys, sometimes not. We need to consider them just like everyone else, on a case by case basis. It IS tough to come up with a blanket description of all cops, isn't it?

yourproductsucks
yourproductsucks

@JohnQ.Public There was a moment in time during this incident where Raetz or his partner were wholy justified in shooting the driver of this hit and run vehicle...imagine the horror if either one were quick enough to have done so...

Imagine the gnashing of teeth of those quick to criticize those who "suck off the the Government teet" when they take the proper action to save their own life or the lives of their fellow officers..Imagine the video blog Gilman would create, condemning their racist, cowardly, police state actions..whilst sittiing in the safety and comfort of his home.

JohnQ.Public
JohnQ.Public

@stephen.lemons Of course both losses of life are tragic.  As I wrote in my comments following the death of  Raymond Berryman, "@dogon It is a tragedy for a mother to have to bury her child. It is a tragedy for someone who may have ultimately become a wonderful contributor to society to be cut down prior to making that contribution. Who knows who or what this kid could have become. Yes, the kids are responsible for the outcome, but that doesn't make it less tragic and to say otherwise is cold, heartless and cruel. That may be the way you choose to live your life, but that is a sad and dark way to live. You can acknowledge blame but also acknowledge the tragedy inherent in the situation."  So, I agree, it is a tragedy that a 16 year old never gets to grow up.

Absolutely the public should question officer use fo force. And we rely on you Stephen, as a member of the media, to ask those questions on our behalf.  But when you make comments like this, "We do know the DPS officer is a white male. Both Wilson and Brown are black," as you did in the Alexander Wilson article, you sound like you've prejudged the answers to your question without waiting for the investigation to be completed and all the facts to be known.  It sounds like you've used race to demonize the officer when you don't have any reason to believe (or at leasst didn't cite any reason) to suggest that the officer's actions were even remotely racist and demonize the officer on those grounds alone. 

JohnQ.Public
JohnQ.Public

@mandymountain Absolutely!  And its especially tough to figure out which is which when you're willing to rush to judgment and villify the live cop and canonize the dead cop before the investigation is complete and all the informaiton is assembled. 

MandyMountain
MandyMountain

@stephen.lemons @JohnQ.Public @dogon Without knowing the whole deal on either case being discussed, please allow me to make an observation: cops almost always walk. Regardless of their culpability, cops almost always walk in homicide cases they argue to be "justifiable." That isn't just here, it's all over. Until more cops are held to account for unjustifiable homicides, they are going to have PR problems with certain segments of the population. In extreme cases, we will see more riots and/or other mayhem a la Rodney King.

JohnQ.Public
JohnQ.Public

@stephen.lemons Less a criticism, more a conversation.  I appreciate the opprotunity to interact with the writers that the PNT blogs creates.

"...as I'm hardly infallible" - Who among us is? 

stephen.lemons
stephen.lemons moderator writer

@JohnQ.Public @stephen.lemons @dogon

"But when you make comments like this, "We do know the DPS officer is a white male. Both Wilson and Brown are black," as you did in the Alexander Wilson article, you sound like you've prejudged the answers to your question without waiting for the investigation to be completed and all the facts to be known."

I'm on record as stating that I believe, given the facts as the Phoenix Police Department has relayed them, that the kid's death was unnecessary. In that same article, I mentioned that I suspect PPD and DPS will find the use of force justified. However, I still think the killing was excessive and avoidable. 

This was the context of the quote you cite:

"We do know the DPS officer is a white male. Both Wilson and Brown are black. But we don't know what the DPS officer could see inside the Tahoe." 

I believe the second sentence is key, as I do not not know if race was a factor. Nor did I say that it was. Is it worth mentioning? Yes, which is why I did. 

I also thought it worth mentioning in the shooting death of Zachariah Pithan that he, and the cops he was struggling with, were all white. It's not like all incidents involving use of force involve the cliche of white cops and folks of color. Far from it. And the Pithan incident is a reminder of that.

I understand your criticism. Thanks and keep it coming, as I'm hardly infallible.

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